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Vision Zero Tops List Of 2015 Greenway Priorities

vision zero seattleBy Cathy Tuttle
November 24, 2014

In November 2014, SNG leaders representing 16 different local groups gathered for their 4th annual fall Prioritization discussion. We’ve had huge success every year as we collectively choose 10 priorities for SNG leaders to support in the following year. Vision Zero easily topped our 2015 list.

We’ll be dedicated this year to making sure all of these priorities are supported and implemented. Our 2015 Priorities are as follows:

    • Vision Zero. Advocate for strong local and city support for engineered speed reduction, enforcement, education, and more. See the New York’s Transportation Alternatives Vision Zero Principles. Join the Vision Zero Seattle Facebook community.
    • Seattle Transportation Levy. Improve funding for active transportation and get out the votes for a citywide funding package as Bridging the Gap expires in 2015.
    • Complete Streets. Make sure our own Complete Streets Ordinance is enforced. Make sure SDOT improvement projects are funded and tied to walk/bike safety improvements. (we’ll also be closely following the development of the Pedestrian Master Plan as it is updated this year.)

Council District Priorities

  • District 1: 35th Ave SW safe intersections  and parallel greenways
  • District 2: Speed reduction and traffic calming on Rainier Ave S and MLK Way S
  • District 3: SR520. Make walk/bike access work for local neighborhoods around SR520.
  • District 4: Wallingford Greenway. Make this “greenway” corridor functional and meet current City standards from Stone Way N & N 43rd, along N 44th . Plan connection to future light rail station on 43rd & Brooklyn NE.
  • District 5: Fund design and early implementation of a N/NW 92nd St. greenway as it crosses both Aurora and I-5 with direct links to Wilson Pacific, North Seattle College, and future Northgate light rail.
  • District 6: 6th Ave NW corridor N-S with particular focus on  6th & NW 65th intersection and BGT connection.
    • District 7: TBD with discussion between Queen Anne Greenways and First Hill Improvement Association.

I lived in Sweden for a whole year with my family, in 2006-2007, studying sustainable city design. I was fortunate to be a part of the discussion of Vision Zero, officially adopted as a national Swedish transportation policy in 2007.

I like this description of Vision Zero by a Swedish expert: “People make mistakes.. so let’s create a system for the humans instead of trying to adjust the humans to the system.” Safe streets are a real possibility when we collectively decide safe street engineering, enforcement, and education are worth spending time and resources on. We at Seattle Neighborhood Greenways (SNG) support the culture of Vision Zero and are thrilled this is now becoming embedded in our City, other active transportation advocacy organizations, and in the public at large.

Leaders of many SNG groups meet to discuss priorities for 2015

Leaders of many SNG groups meet to discuss priorities for 2015