Category Archive: Events

Join the #Party4OurStreets

#Party4OurStreetsIf you care about safe streets in Seattle, this party is for you! Join Seattle Neighborhood Greenways as we celebrate the amazing accomplishments of the past year and honor our volunteers, allies, and City partners for the wonderful work you are doing. Beer, food, prizes, awards, a kids craft table with @FamilyRide, a photobooth, and more are in store for you. 

Space is limited so reserve your spot today.

What: A #Party4OurStreets
When: Thursday, December 11, 2014
Time: 5:00-8:00, 7:00 award ceremony
Location: The Historic Washington Hall in the Lodge Room in the First Hill Neighborhood. 153 14th Ave, Seattle WA 98122
Cost: Completely free!

REGISTER HERE:  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/party4ourstreets-tickets-14279609697

Facebook Event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1524269534480779/

See the event program and list of nominees for the Greenways awards!

35th Ave SW Safety Project Kicks Off

 

May 2013 crash 35th/Roxbury. Photo by Christopher Boffoli/West Seattle Blog/used with permission.

May 2013 crash 35th/Roxbury. Photo by Christopher Boffoli/West Seattle Blog/used with permission.

James St. Clair was the latest in a long and sad list of pedestrian and bicycle fatalities along 35th Ave SW. Seattle Neighborhood Greenways led a Memorial Walk and Solutions Meeting for Mr. St. Clair in January 2014.

1,065 crashes in 10 years on a three mile stretch of four-lane road lined mainly with single family homes led 35th Avenue SW to be dubbed “I-35” by the community.

Soon after the Memorial Walk and Solutions Meeting for Mr. St. Clair, the Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) announced a road safety project.

On October 22, SDOT officially launched their 35th Avenue SW Road Safety Corridor Project at two well-attended meetings.

We will continue to monitor the project and hope that with robust speed control and traffic safety improvements, this residential street will finally become a safe and healthy community connector in West Seattle.

The Great Ballard Pumpkin Count

photo courtesy Madi Carlson @familyride

photo courtesy Madi Carlson @familyride

The theory to test: Pumpkins per block dramatically increase after greenways are added to Seattle streets.

Pumpkins may potentially be a good (and fun!) indicator of community connections, family-friendliness, walkability, and health.

Ballard Greenways pumpkin counters want to carve out a head start on pumpkin counting. Here’s their invite.

  • Meet at 5:30 p.m. at 17th & Leary on bikes for preliminary count of 17th Ave NW
  • Stop at 6:30 p.m. at Chuck’s Hop Shop 656 NW 85th St. for a glass of pumpkin beer
  • Return south via 6th Ave NW and West via the wonderful NW 58th St Greenway for a fun ride to another prospective greenway
  • Folks should bring lights!

Ballard and several other local greenway groups will to do pumpkin counting on Halloween night as well. They’ll look at existing greenways and proposed greenways. Ideally, they’ll collect data and save it so they can compare pumpkin counts in the same locations next Halloween.

Parents and kids will count, Halloween partygoers will count. Pumpkin counters need to create an on-line spreadsheet to collect reports.

Meanwhile, debate is raging about pumpkin counting criteria. Should counters count all pumpkins or houses with any number of pumpkins as a single entity? Should we count smashed pumpkins? And what about those small pumpkins?  Gourds? Fake (plastic or fabric) pumpkins vs real pumpkins?

Anyone up for the count?

Vigil Walk for Zeytuna Edo

photo of Zeytuna with mapcasaynaya lugaynta ee Zeytuna

Waa maxay cusub oo la Seattle Neighborhood Greenways?

Zeytuna was walking with her family at Genesee and MLK when she became the victim of a hit and run car collision, leaving her hospitalized with very serious injuries.  Her family and the community have planned a gathering to bring attention to this incident involving Zeytuna and to talk about making our streets safer for all.

DONATE to Zeytuna’s family through YouCaring.com

Please read this letter to Mayor Ed Murray about Solutions for Traffic Safety in Rainier Vista   Fadlan akhri warqadan inuu Mayor Ed Murray oo ku saabsan Fikrado Gaadiidka Ammaan ee Rainier Vista

The Vigil Walk for Zeytuna Edo started at Columbia City Light Rail Station at Alaska & Martin Luther King and stopped at Genesee & MLK for a healing Vigil. The Solutions Meeting at the Boys & Girls Club – where Zeytuna & her family were headed when she was struck featured Mayor Ed Murray, Councilmember Bruce Harrell, Family members, and community neighbors and leaders.

Upcoming Rainier Valley meetings

  • Rainier Ave S Road Safety Corridor Project SDOT Columbia City Wed Nov 12 6-8pm
  • Rainier Ave S Road Safety Corridor Project SDOT Rainier Beach Tues Nov 18 4:30-6:30pm
  • Rainier Valley Greenways monthly meeting. Bike Works 3715 S Hudson St Wed Nov 18 6:30-8:30pm

Contacts:
– Rainier Valley Greenways- Phyllis Porter 206-695-2522 / 253-545-8567

– Bike Works- Deb Salls 206-695-2607 / 651-231-3629

– Seattle Neighborhood Greenways- Cathy Tuttle 206-713-5869

Re-engineering a safety corridor on PARK(ing) Day

A few of the harworking and happy Park(ing) Day crew.

A few of the hardworking and happy Park(ing) Day crew.

University Greenways and NE Greenways teamed up for the September 19th PARK(ing) Day to create a successful pilot of a safer street, bridge, and corridor for people who walk, bike, and drive. The design was so well-produced that Seattle City Traffic Engineer Dongho Chang and SDOT Director Scott Kubly blogged about it and vowed to explore the design for future implementation.

SDOT Chief Engineer impressed w Park(ing) Day

NE Greenways leader Andres Salomon enlisted help from multiple Greenways groups and friends. Ballard Greenways and Madison Park Greenways got curb ramps donated from a construction site, Jackson Commons and Franz Bakery provided the homemade cornstarch paint that had also been used for a giant Hopscotch game in Jackson Park (Cascade Bicycle Club used the same recipe, but dyed green — for their pop-up protected bike lane on 9th Ave), UW Transportation loaned orange cones, and SDOT approved.

Andres, Mika, Sage, Max, Sander, Jeff, and Kristin worked through the night to paint the temporary bike lanes and curb bulbs (finishing up at 2am!). Various folks from different groups helped staff the event throughout the day, including Jeff who went out of his way to help remind drivers to yield to people crossing 15th Ave NE. Volunteers brought coffee, snacks, books, greenery, chairs, tables, and even a rug, while Convoy Coffee brought a self-contained bike trailer with heat, water, & all manner of drink.

This project used protected bike lanes to slow down cars and provide a comfortable space for people on bikes. Curb ramps and curb bulbs were used to help people cross a wide, busy intersection. An unused street (a “slip lane”) was closed and temporarily returned back to the community.

It’s not too soon to be thinking about PARK(ing) Day 2015. By using some inexpensive or donated materials, a community can completely change the feel of a normally dangerous street for a day. How can YOUR neighborhood group collaborate on ideas that are fun for the day and perhaps model how streets can be improved in the future?

More photos (click to enlarge):

Outdoor space for families Park(ing) Day Volunteers work along the street Park(ing) Day

Keep permits handy for officials Park(ing) Day

Safer family crossing Park(ing) Day

Design essential for easy frieght transit movement Park(ing) Day

Convoy Coffee delivery Park(ing) Day

Toddler approved Park(ing) Day street

Plant donations for Park(ing) Day

Find old curb ramps from construction site debris Park(ing) Day

A temporary curb ramp, as this crossing connects multiple park trails, and is widely used by the disabled, kids on bikes, and others who have difficulty with the curb.

Red = protected bike lanes

Red = protected bike lanes

Park(ing) Day Design by Andres Salomon

Red = protected bike lanes
Purple = curb bulb/extension

Painting all Night Park(ing) Day

The freshly painted street the night before

PARK(ing) Day Makes Places for People

September 22, 2014
Cathy Tuttle, Seattle Neighborhood Greenways Executive Director

I LOVE PARK(ing) Day! This nationally celebrated civic holiday fully embodies the foundation of Seattle Neighborhood Greenways: Streets really are places for people.

This year I traveled with a few friends to about 30 of the 50 PARK(ing) Day spaces open 9-3 on September 19. It’s worth noting that our local Greenways-affiliated groups stepped up this year to be part of teams to build 10 of those 50 PARK(ing) spaces.

Seattle Neighborhood Greenways groups converted the highly trafficked bridge over Ravenna Park at 15th Ave NE from a four-lane road into a two-laner with biking and walking paths on either side.

Seattle Neighborhood Greenways groups converted the highly trafficked bridge over Ravenna Park at 15th Ave NE from a four-lane road into a two-laner with biking and walking paths on either side.

I didn’t have time to go as far north as Lake City or as far south as Bike Works — and we missed the West Seattle Bike Connections setup in front of Husky Deli too — but from Ballard to Broadway, Ravenna Park to the I-District, people around Seattle figured out how to turn asphalt into a malleable medium of joyful public space.

Here are some highlights:
Re-imagineering the Street. All PARK(ing) Day spots take up public right-of-way. Cascade Bicycle Club and Seattle Neighborhood Greenways took a LOT of right-of-way and turned whole streets into places.

Cascade Bike Club also grabbed a street South Lake Union and successfully turned it into two lanes of traffic and a two-way protected bike lane for the day. Re-engineering streets for PARK(ing) Day might become a whole lot more popular in future years. Hope so!

Cascade Bike Club also grabbed a street South Lake Union and successfully turned it into two lanes of traffic and a two-way protected bike lane for the day. Re-engineering streets for PARK(ing) Day might become a whole lot more popular in future years. Hope so!

Seattle Neighborhood Greenways groups University Greenways and NE Seattle Greenways, closed a little-used connector street and converted the highly trafficked bridge over Ravenna Park at 15th Ave NE from a four-lane road into a two-laner with biking and walking paths on either side.

The full story is in this post about the bridge conversion and how it impressed our new SDOT Director Scott Kubly and SDOT Traffic Engineer Dongho Chang so much they are talking about making some of the changes permanent.

Books Belong on the Street. People like to read in public and Seattle is a literate city. Let’s celebrate that! Seattle Public Librarians read banned books in Belltown. Little Free Libraries featured prominently in several PARK(ing) Day pop-ups. Plenty of book give-aways including this setup designed by Schemata Workshop in front of Eltana Bagels in Capitol Hill with books provided by Elliot Bay Bookstore. Here, Tom Fucoloro of Seattle Bike Blog and Kelli Refer, author of Pedal Stretch Breathe take a blogging/reading break.

Schemata Workshop designed spot in front of Eltana Bagels in Capitol Hill with books provided by Elliot Bay Bookstore. Here, Tom Fucoloro of Seattle Bike Blog and Kelli Refer, author of Pedal Stretch Breathe take a blogging/reading break.

Schemata Workshop designed spot in front of Eltana Bagels in Capitol Hill with books provided by Elliot Bay Bookstore. Here, Tom Fucoloro of Seattle Bike Blog and Kelli Refer, author of Pedal Stretch Breathe take a blogging/reading break.

We Want to Play in the Street. Games, photos booths, fun. We love to play in the street at every age. Girls on the Run was one of several playful pop-ups in South Lake Union. Participants who “ran around mini-Green Lake” were awarded a chocolate medal.

Girls on the Run was one of several playful pop-ups in South Lake Union.

Girls on the Run was one of several playful pop-ups in South Lake Union.

People Like to Sit in Funky Furniture. Tom Fucoloro takes another blogging break, sitting here on the mini-golf course designed by Atelier Drome. Read Tom’s PARK(ing) Day report on Seattle Bike Blog.

Tom Fucoloro blogging on the mini-golf course designed by Atelier Drome.

Tom Fucoloro blogging on the mini-golf course designed by Atelier Drome.

The Unbearable Longing for Green. Most all PARK(ing) Day spots tried to add a touch of green. Many ended up with scraggly potted plants and pots of petunias. No one did green better than HBB Landscape Architecture. Their staff created three rooms, representing three planted zones found in Western Washington. Kelli and I walked through this double parking spot oasis a handful of times. We’d step off the sidewalk and into the pop-up and each time felt the pull of the ferns, a hint of the wind in the trees, and we’d instantly relax. We need more beautiful wild biodiversity all over Seattle.

HBB Landscape Architecture created three rooms, representing three planted zones found in Western Washington.

HBB Landscape Architecture created three rooms, representing three planted zones found in Western Washington.

Healthy Streets Build Healthy Businesses 10 Ways. We’re guessing many of the businesses that extended into the street on PARK(ing) Day 2014 will be eager to be part of the parklet program by next year. In fact, Molly Moon’s Ice Cream in Wallingford launched their new parklet on this PARK(ing) Day!

Jimi Hendrix-inspired, music-themed activity park in front of Pioneer Square businesses

Jimi Hendrix-inspired, music-themed activity park in front of Pioneer Square businesses

Note to Schools: Send Your Kids to Play in the Street. Another note for 2015, schools need to get into the act! From Universities to preschools, we’d love to see more schools that let children imagine the world they want and need. What better way than starting with a PARK(ing) Day pop-up with bamboo bike racks here at Salmon Bay School in Ballard?

Bamboo bike racks at Salmon Bay School in Ballard

Bamboo bike racks at Salmon Bay School in Ballard

SDOT Puts People First. Jennifer Wieland is the hard-working genius in the SDOT Public Space Management program. She coordinates Parklets, Play Streets, PARK(ing) Day and much more. Jennifer and I both started our day in the Pronto Bike Share PARK(ing) Day space on Capitol Hill.

Cathy Tuttle, Seattle Neighborhood Greenways & Jennifer Wieland, SDOT Public Space Management program at Pronto Pop-up.

Cathy Tuttle, Seattle Neighborhood Greenways & Jennifer Wieland, SDOT Public Space Management program at Pronto’s Pop-up.

Upgrades needed on another deadly Seattle street

Originally published September 2, 2014
By Andres Salomon

It is completely unacceptable a street known to be as dangerous as Roosevelt Way NE is not being aggressively examined for traffic calming and other improvements during its 2015 reconstruction. Read the complete report here.

Join a Walking Audit co-hosted by Feet First Tuesday, Sept 2 at 5:30pm. A Bicycle Brainstorming Session co-hosted by Cascade Bicycle Club is scheduled for Wednesday, Sept 3 at 6pm.

Screen Shot 2014-09-02 at 1.28.40 AM

By focusing on quick, cheap, paint-only solutions, the 2015 construction has the potential to create non-protected “mixing zones” at intersections. Mixing zones are where bikes share a lane with buses and cars that are turning right. As funding becomes available, later work could focus on traffic signal upgrades that allowed bikes to safely traverse intersections without needing to mix with cars or buses.

We can and should be asking much more from our multi-million dollar maintenance projects. Concerned neighbors are organizing community efforts to help identify needed walking and biking improvements along Roosevelt Way.  I look forward to our community successfully engaging with the city to push forward on additional solutions that will Roosevelt a safer, more humane street.

The repaving project includes the University Bridge (Eastlake Ave NE), Roosevelt Way NE between the University Bridge and NE 65th St, and small portions of 11th Ave NE and NE 42nd St.

What Astonished Us About Bike To School Day Was Way More Than Numbers

JSIS Bike to School Day May 7 2014

JSIS Bike to School Day May 7 2014

Today the Census Bureau released its newest report on commuting in America. There’s been a 60 percent increase in bike commuting in America over the past decade. Portland is #1 at 6.1%, and Seattle ranks #5 at 3.4%.

You need to know the trip to work is all this report tracks and trip to work is the tip of the bicycle iceberg. Almost twice as many of our trips are to the gym, the grocery store, the movie theater, and taking our kids to school.

We don’t measure these trips nearly as well as we should. And because we don’t measure, we don’t build the safe, family-friendly streets to support these trips either. That is about to change in Seattle.

We did do a little measurement on the May 7 2014 Bike to School Day.  It was an awesome display of kid power, family power, and community power. The excitement and pride as reports rolled in from all over Seattle was breathtaking.

Just a little energy from the Walk.Bike.Schools! blog:

  • We counted 136 bikes in the Salmon Bay K-8 Bike Alley, and that number doesn’t even include all of the skateboards, scooters, roller blades, and kids on foot that we saw. Impossible to know for sure, but our full tally is probably around 160 arriving by kid-powered modes of transportation.
  • At Eckstein Middle we have 49 today. We consider that a huge success, as we are still trying to crack the middle school code (how do those brains work, anyway?). If you have ideas, let us know.
  • We’re tracking numbers here at Cascade…up to 1315 so far for elementary and K-8 students and 93 at middle schools.  Shout out to newcomers on the Bike to School scene…Lowell Elementary with 25 students, McDonald International with 120, Pacific Crest with 70, and Whitman Middle School with 36!  SPS Superintendent Jose Banda led one of two bike trains to Alki Elementary this morning with more than 150 people on bikes!
  • I’m pretty sure we had our biggest “Bike to School Day Doughnut Ride” ever at Bryant. Our best-guess count is 200+ riders (parents and kids). That’s a lot of potential mayhem but everything went smoothly and everyone remained rubber-side down. Phew!
  • At John Stanford International School we had a bike train of 91! (That includes a couple scooters). Counting bikes and scooters (tho only a handful were scooters) on the racks, fences, and trees after the bell rang yielded 94, but that doesn’t count the many trailer biked kids and bikes that don’t stick around so probably it’s really a tad higher. Awesome day!
  • With all these students as inspiration, we have 4 Seattle Public School administration bike teams of nearly 10 each, plus individual riders at the John Stanford Center for this year’s bike-to-work month.
  • Whittier had 155 (with about 4 or 5 unicycles)!
  • I’m so jealous!!  We had 7 at Denny!  SO SAD!!!  I am thinking MSP testing and being a Wednesday didn’t help but man I was disappointed :(  But I’m gonna keep trying!
  • Laurelhurst Elementary had 121 kiddos bike/unicycle today. We have about 430 students in the school. They all loved the treats and stickers. What a beautiful day – who ordered the weather for the event?  :-)
  • Stevens Elementary counted more than 100 bikes yesterday! (101 to be exact.) One of them was a tandem, too.

The lesson from Bike to School? We need to keep supporting our kids with ever safer streets for walking and biking to school.

If people riding bikes act as the “canary in the coal mine” as indicators of a safe, healthy city, kids on bikes are the bright song of that canary.

Listen!

photo-16

JSIS Bike Train May 7 2014

Stats from Walk.Bike.School for May 7 2014

  1. Bryant K-5                            200+
  2. Whittier K-5                          155
  3. Alki ElementaryK-5            150
  4. Salmon Bay K-8                 136
  5. Laurelhurst K-5                  121
  6. McDonald K-5                    120
  7. Stevens K-5                        101
  8. JSIS K-5                                91
  9. Pacific Crest K-5                 70
  10. Eckstein 6-8                        49

Greenway Wonkathon 2014

Wonkthon evaluation tableEXECUTIVE SUMMARY

On February 22, 70 thought leaders came together representing the City of Seattle, advocacy and community groups, the University of Washington, and design & engineering firms. The Greenway Wonkathon: a half-day collaborative event focused great minds on improving neighborhood greenway design and development. The topics areas we discussed were greenway development, segment design, intersection design, place-making, evaluation, and political strategy.

spokespeople-mar2014-2The Wonkathon was a huge success! Thank you! We left knowing we are a dynamic community dedicated to the idea of creating 250 miles of safe and healthy streets to Seattle in 10 years. We generated excellent strategies and actions to help us accomplish that lofty goal. Initials of people who signed up to help bring each idea to life are shown in the right hand column in the table below. Now is the time to turn your passion and ideas into action!  We invite you to connect and move forward with other people who are passionate about the same ideas and projects via the Greenway Wonkathon Google Group. Contact Gordon @ SeattleGreenways.org to join. Actions are already happening!

The ideas from the Wonkathon are organized into four high-level themes that emerged and cut across all six topic areas:

  1. Experiment and cut red tape
  2. Empower local communities
  3. Activate the streets
  4. Measure and communicate our successes
Wonkathon outcomes

Wonkathon panorama

Wonkathon outcomes 2

 
 

single bold step

UW students tap wisdom of Greenwood-Phinney Greenways

Greenwood Phinney Greenways meets UW Landscape classFor the second year, students of UW Landscape Architecture Professor Julie Johnson have made Seattle Neighborhood Greenways the focus of their studio work.

This year, the focus on Greenwood-Phinney Greenways centers around safe streets, and, in particular, how to design safer streets in places without sidewalks. We know this 2014 UW class will bring great solutions to Greenwood-Phinney Greenways!

In 2013, Landscape Architecture 402 students worked on a design plan for Lake City Greenways. Several of the student plans for safer, greener streets are already being implemented by the Lake CIty community and Seattle Department of Transportation.

 

  • Facebook photos of the first community-student meeting at Greenwood Branch Library January 16 2014.
  • Sign up here

    to get updates about future meetings in Greenwood and at the UW on the Greenwood Phinney Greenways project.

 

 

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