Tag Archive: bicycle

South Lake Union by Bike?

October 1, 2015

South Lake Union Seattle Neighborhood Greenways Scouting Ride July 2015

South Lake Union Seattle Neighborhood Greenways Scouting Ride July 2015

In July 2015, Seattle Neighborhood Greenways brought together a group of stakeholders to scout and recommend better east‐west connections between the Cascade and Uptown neighborhoods for families and people of all ages and abilities to navigate the fastest growing part of Seattle by bike.

The scouting ride had representatives from the Seattle Bicycle Advisory Board, the Seattle Department of Transportation, the Seattle Department of Planning and Development, Seattle Parks, Seattle Parks Foundation, the Lake to Bay Loop Coalition, Seattle Bike Blog, Queen Anne Greenways, Cascade Bicycle Club, Lake Union Greenways, Central Seattle Greenways, and the Seattle City Council.

Top Four Recommendations

  1. Roll Out the G​reen Carpet:​T​he Mercer Street Underpass is an excellent and important all ages and abilities route across Aurora. Extend the “green carpet” east, west, and south in order to connect South Lake Union, Uptown, and Seattle Center.​

    top four Lake to Bay reccomenations

    Top Four Recommendations

  2. Lake to Bay Broad Street must be all ages and abilitiesSharrows on Broad Street are not an acceptable level of safety or comfort for this major redesign proposed by the Lake to Bay Planning effort. While confident adults may feel comfortable taking the lane on bicycles in traffic, the majority people do not.
  3. Upgrade the Thomas Green Street to neighborhood greenway standards. Thomas Street between Eastlake Ave E and 5th Ave N could be a world‐class east‐west bike route once the Aurora overpass is built.
  4. Build a Greenway from the Thomas St Overpass to the Seattle Center.​ How to get from the waterfront to Seattle Center by bike? The best route scouted between the beautiful Thomas Street Overpass and Seattle Center’s August Wilson Way is a zig‐zag route.

Scroll, zoom, and click the map recommendations below to learn more or view in a new window. Read the rest of this entry »

PARKing Day 2015 Makes Successful Streets

Five local neighborhood groups changed their streets on a grand scale on Friday September 18.

People in Rainier, Ballard, Ravenna, Bryant and Fremont were winners of Seattle Neighborhood Greenways first annual PARK(ing) Day Design Competition.

Instead of endless public meetings, design charettes, and flat conceptual drawings, we helped these four groups build protected intersections in Ballard and Bryant, and thousands of feet of protected bike lanes in Rainier and Ravenna. Here’s a look at what happened.

Rainier Ave S Protected Bike Lanes

Rainier Ave S Protected Bike Lanes

Rainier

The Grand Prize Winner was an ambitious idea to make Rainier Avenue South, Seattle’s most dangerous street, safe enough for a parent to bike with their four-year-old (you must watch this YouTube!)

A crew, led by visionary Shirley Savel, and leaders Adam Dodge and Travis Merrigan, built 2000 linear feet of bike lanes out of white chalk, white duct tape, green butcher paper and traffic cones on both sides of Rainier between Columbia City and Hillman City.

Ballard Greenways Protected Intersection

Ballard Greenways Protected Intersection

Ballard

The co-leader of Ballard Greenways, Chris Saleeba, also works at one of Seattle’s best bicycle and pedestrian design firms, Alta Planning and Design. Chris, Fred Young, and Steve Durrant of Alta created a protected intersection that was extremely effective at slowing vehicles and allowing people to safely walk and bike across NW 65th and 6th Ave NW, just where the next north-south greenway in Ballard is planned.

The Seattle Department of Transportation concurred NW 65th and 6th NW was a high priority for safety improvements and added a permanent crosswalk in record time.

Chris said the bar owner of Molly McGuires – the most active business in front of the new intersection – came out during the day and talked about how much he loved the improvements and wondered if he could get the crosswalk painted in Irish flag colors as part of Mayor Murray and the Department of Neighborhood’s new community crosswalk program. Read the rest of this entry »

Greenways Receives Major SDOT Award

Cathy Tuttle
September 12, 2015

SDOT Director Scott Kubly awards SNGreenways 2015 Transportation Team Award

Seattle Department of Transportation Director Scott Kubly presents Seattle Neighborhood Greenways with the 2015 Transportation Team Award

On September 10, 2015, Seattle Neighborhood Greenways (SNG) received the Transportation Team Award from Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT). SDOT gives just one annual award to “individuals or teams from other departments/groups or citizens not employed by the city, such as volunteers or non‑profit groups who help to advance SDOT’s mission, vision, and goals.”

Before the awards ceremony, in true grassroots activist fashion, nine SNG leaders spread out among the SDOT managers at tables filling City Hall’s Bertha Knight Landes room and learned more about various SDOT functions and discussed how SNG can help to advocate for future funding and safety improvements for a variety of new street projects including signals, paving, sidewalks, and safe routes to school.

Here is the complete text from SDOT of why Seattle Neighborhood Greenways organization was nominated for and received this coveted award. Thank you for the honor! We look forward to many more years of productive collaboration!

Seattle Neighborhood Greenways (SNG) has changed, and improved, the way Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) works with community partners in doing outreach and public engagement. The Bicycle Master Plan (BMP) was an innovative combination of staff, consultant, and community resources, which led to a final product that had broad public, and Council, support.SDOT 2015 Transporation Team Award Plaques

Seattle Neighborhood Greenways is being nominated for their proactive and innovative community support for the development, and adoption of, the Seattle Bicycle Master Plan.

Seattle Neighborhood Greenways (SNG) took an active and critical role in developing the Seattle Bicycle Master Plan (BMP), which was approved by City Council in April, 2014, after a 2-year planning process. Seattle Neighborhood Greenways groups took the initiative, in small neighborhood-focused groups throughout the city, to identify good greenways streets in their own neighborhoods, share that information with SDOT (including a map prepared in GIS), and attend community meetings on the plan update. This resulted in significant resource and cost savings for SDOT’s efforts on the BMP. Over 200 miles of greenways were included in the final BMP.

Seattle Neighborhood Greenways (SNG) took the initiative, on a volunteer basis, of organizing community members to do walking tours and fieldwork on streets in their neighborhoods, which contributed significantly to the development of the final Bicycle Master Plan (BMP). These efforts supplemented the work by City staff and consultants, and allowed a level of detailed effort and analysis that would not have been possible with City resources alone. SNG staff and volunteers also participated actively in community meetings relating to the development of the BMP, helped develop thinking around an “all ages and abilities” bicycle network and helped advocate for the Plan’s adoption with City Council.

SNGreenways leaders Cathy Tuttle, Phyllis Porter, Don Brubeck, Merlin Rainwater, Robin Randels, Barbara Gordon, Selena Carsiotis with SDOT Director Scott Kubly

SDOT Director Scott Kubly with SNGreenways leaders Cathy Tuttle, Phyllis Porter, Don Brubeck, Merlin Rainwater, Robin Randels, Barbara Gordon, Selena Carsiotis

Seattle Neighborhood Greenways volunteers exceeded the usual expectations by community groups in terms of not only participating in SDOT-led community events on the BMP, but also organizing their own events, including neighborhood walks and bike rides. They also presented information on their own initiative to District Councils and other larger community organizations. Finally, they documented and presented information to SDOT in Geographic Information System (GIS) form, which SDOT was able to use in preparing maps of the final system network for the BMP.

Rasmussen Stands Up For Sidewalks

Councilmember Rasmussen at James St Clair Memorial Walk @WestSeattleBlog.com photo

Councilmember Rasmussen at James St Clair Memorial Walk @WestSeattleBlog.com photo

September 3, 2015

Tom Rasmussen has chaired the Seattle City Council Transportation Committee for years. While Bertha, streetcars, unprecedented traffic congestion, and freight take a lot of his attention, the Councilmember has remained attentive to the needs of people who walk and bike.

Most recently, Rasmussen has weighed in on Sound Transit’s construction closure of the 12th Ave NE Greenway. Construction closures are a hot item right now in Seattle. Here’s what Councilmember Rasmussen had to say:

I have requested [Seattle Department of Transportation] SDOT to continue to work to improve mobility and safety for everyone around construction zones.  One of the first tours I organized for Mr. Kubly [SDOT Director] was of one epicenter of construction: the Pike/Pine neighborhood on Capitol Hill.  We have had a number of updates and briefings from SDOT about their work to ensure compliance by contractors and progress is being made.

SDOT should not give permission to close a sidewalk or street or part of one until SDOT has approved the detour plans and routes.  Even when a plan is approved some contractors or their workers will arbitrarily move barriers to the detriment of the public.  This requires regular site visits by SDOT inspectors.  One of the challenges is that there are not enough inspectors to keep up with the volume of construction.  I have requested SDOT to hire more as soon as possible

Thanks for bringing this to my attention.

Councilmember Tom Rasmussen
Chair, Transportation Committee Seattle City Council

Thank you for speaking up for people who walk and bike. We need strong support from our leaders all over Seattle!

Spoke & Food Was A Great Success!

Spoke & Food Founder Heather Sletteback with son Jordon

Spoke & Food Founder Heather Sletteback with son Jordon

While they were courting, Heather & Garett Sletteback discovered that riding their bicycles together as they went out for dinner was one of their favorite activities. The Sletteback’s turned their passion into an annual fundraiser and “friend-raiser” for one lucky beneficiary each year. This year, Seattle Neighborhood Greenways was the lucky organization supported by Spoke & Food!

KING5 Lori Matsukawa introduces Natalie Swaby Spoke & Food story

Click here to see KING5 Lori Matsukawa / Natalie Swaby Spoke & Food story

Between local Seattle Neighborhood Greenways volunteers who acted as hosts, 12 restaurants around Seattle (most donated 20% of their evening’s take), group ride leaders, and a whole community who turned out to support Seattle Neighborhood Greenways and our work for Vision Zero and safe streets, we can say without a doubt that we agree with Heather & Garett, that Spoke & Food is a most excellent summer activity!

King-5 reported on Spoke & Food and our safe streets advocacy. Read the rest of this entry »

Spoke & Food Benefits SNGreenways 7/28/15

Bike with your friends & family to your favorite restaurants to benefit Seattle Neighborhood Greenways on Tuesday, July 28 from 5 to 9 p.m. (riding your bike is not a requirement for participation in this fun evening charity event).

Click on the poster to let us know you plan to attend.
Spoke & Food poster

12 Great Reasons to Bike to Dinner!

Bike and dine at one or more of the many great Seattle area restaurants or breweries that will each donate 20% of their total sales from the evening to this year’s event beneficiary, the non-profit road safety group Seattle Neighborhood Greenways.

Ballard (North) – Barking Dog Alehouse
Ballard (South) – Maritime Pacific Brewery
Capitol Hill – Canterbury Alehouse
Fremont – Fremont Brewery
Greenlake – Lucia
Greenwood – RAZZI’s Pizzeria
Interbay/Magnolia – Highliner Public House
Northgate – The Watershed Pub & Kitchen
Ravenna – Vios Café at Third Place Books
Seward Park – Flying Squirrel Pizza
West Seattle – The Westy
White Center – Proletariat Pizza

Event Co-sponsors include Whole Foods, Kinetic Sports Rehab, Queen Anne Eye Clinic, New Roots Organic, and Gregg’s Cycle.

Seattle Neighborhood Greenways is your safe street advocacy coalition representing 20 local neighborhood groups across Seattle. Volunteers in each neighborhood plan and advocate for safe and comfortable streets connecting people to the places they want to go. Volunteers lend their support to citywide projects including Vision Zero, Safe Routes to School, Pavement to Parks, Complete Streets, and Memorial Walks.

Congratulations Children’s Hospital on New Bicycle Service Center!

Childrens Hospital Service Center OpeningMarch 21, 2015

Seattle Children Hospital celebrates the grand opening of its new Staff Bicycle Service Center. This onsite full-service bike shop will offer staff convenient access to free tune-ups and safety checks, discounts on bicycle commuting gear, and free classes and demos.

The service center is just the newest part of a larger Children’s strategy to reduce barriers to bike commuting. Children’s was instrumental in getting the 39th Ave NE Greenway built and has exceptional support for biking. For example, staff have free use of a bicycle when they pledge to bike to work at least two times per week year-round.

The service center is part of a broader strategy to reduce barriers to bike commuting, thereby increasing the number of Children’s staff biking to work and decreasing the number of staff driving alone to work. This larger goal is a key element of Children’s 2010 Major Institution Master Plan and is intimately tied to the expansion of Children’s clinical space. Increasing clinical space is of critical importance to Children’s ability to be able to provide care to every child in the region who needs us. In order to expand its clinical space, Children’s made a commitment to the City of Seattle to mitigate traffic congestion associated with the expansion of the hospital.

Read the rest of this entry »

UW Class Studies How to Market Walking & Biking For Transportation

click on image to read full student report on Walking & Biking for Transportation

click on image to read full student report on Walking and Biking for Transportation

Every year, Seattle Neighborhood Greenways staff meets with UW faculty and students to set up guided research projects and classes.

In the fall of 2014, we worked with Urban Design & Planning Instructor Megan Horst to help develop a UW Studio class focused on behavior change that would lead to more walking and biking at UW. Students worked on how best to market active transportation choices to students.

We were especially taken with the project called “Secret Shopping at Bike Shops”.

The student team  analyzed three bike shops near campus and ranked them on customer friendliness to students who are new bike users. Their survey’s included “Quality of Employee Questions” and “Addressed Misconceptions”. They made recommendations on what needs to be done to improve the shopping experience for students who are looking to buy a  bicycle.

The student group found bike shop employees are not trained in marketing to people who need a bicycle for everyday transportation and that students don’t understand what to look for in a basic commuter bike.

Their report concludes, “If the University Transportation Services can connect more fully with the shops in the area, they can help promote them and foster more bicycling among the student body.”

 

 

Rackathon: Bringing the Best of Bike Parking to Seattle

If you regularly ride your bike in Seattle, you’ve likely had trouble parking your bike. Often, there just aren’t enough bike racks to go around. Sometimes they’re far away or in an odd location—like behind a dumpster, or right up next to a building. And sometimes the racks are just poorly designed and hard to use, particularly if you ride something like an extracycle or a family bike.

On July 9th, over 90 people gathered to help solve these problems at Rackathon: A Regional Summit to Hack the Bike Parking Code. The event, organized by Brock Howell of Cascade Bicycle Club and Bob Edmiston of Madison Greenways, brought together bike advocates, developers, policymakers, city employees from several municipalities, and design firms to work on standards for where bike racks need to go, and to test out a variety of different bike rack designs.

Rackathon participants evaluate a bike rack design.

Rackathon participants evaluate a bike rack design.

Four vendors showed up with their bike racks, and participants got to test them out with a variety of different bicycles. Participants also heard a presentation from the Scott Cohen of the Portland Bureau of Transportation. One big takeaway? Portland has not one, but TWO full time employees devoted to bike parking—amazing! Seattle, with several employees intermittently working on bike parking, has a little catching up to do. If you want to encourage people to bike for everyday transportation, it makes sense to have dedicated professional bike parking staff.

While we may have some catching up to do, Rackathon was a big step forward, with enthusiastic participation from concerned citizens and public officials alike who are passionate about bringing Seattle’s bike parking up to speed. More photos of the event on Facebook. We also learned from Kyle at SDOT just how simple it is to request a bike rack. Check out the video, How to request a bike rack in 30 seconds, and get started on making Seattle a more bike-friendly place to be!

Want more details? See How Seattle can build more and better bike racks from the Seattle Bike Blog.

What Astonished Us About Bike To School Day Was Way More Than Numbers

JSIS Bike to School Day May 7 2014

JSIS Bike to School Day May 7 2014

Today the Census Bureau released its newest report on commuting in America. There’s been a 60 percent increase in bike commuting in America over the past decade. Portland is #1 at 6.1%, and Seattle ranks #5 at 3.4%.

You need to know the trip to work is all this report tracks and trip to work is the tip of the bicycle iceberg. Almost twice as many of our trips are to the gym, the grocery store, the movie theater, and taking our kids to school.

We don’t measure these trips nearly as well as we should. And because we don’t measure, we don’t build the safe, family-friendly streets to support these trips either. That is about to change in Seattle.

We did do a little measurement on the May 7 2014 Bike to School Day.  It was an awesome display of kid power, family power, and community power. The excitement and pride as reports rolled in from all over Seattle was breathtaking.

Just a little energy from the Walk.Bike.Schools! blog:

  • We counted 136 bikes in the Salmon Bay K-8 Bike Alley, and that number doesn’t even include all of the skateboards, scooters, roller blades, and kids on foot that we saw. Impossible to know for sure, but our full tally is probably around 160 arriving by kid-powered modes of transportation.
  • At Eckstein Middle we have 49 today. We consider that a huge success, as we are still trying to crack the middle school code (how do those brains work, anyway?). If you have ideas, let us know.
  • We’re tracking numbers here at Cascade…up to 1315 so far for elementary and K-8 students and 93 at middle schools.  Shout out to newcomers on the Bike to School scene…Lowell Elementary with 25 students, McDonald International with 120, Pacific Crest with 70, and Whitman Middle School with 36!  SPS Superintendent Jose Banda led one of two bike trains to Alki Elementary this morning with more than 150 people on bikes!
  • I’m pretty sure we had our biggest “Bike to School Day Doughnut Ride” ever at Bryant. Our best-guess count is 200+ riders (parents and kids). That’s a lot of potential mayhem but everything went smoothly and everyone remained rubber-side down. Phew!
  • At John Stanford International School we had a bike train of 91! (That includes a couple scooters). Counting bikes and scooters (tho only a handful were scooters) on the racks, fences, and trees after the bell rang yielded 94, but that doesn’t count the many trailer biked kids and bikes that don’t stick around so probably it’s really a tad higher. Awesome day!
  • With all these students as inspiration, we have 4 Seattle Public School administration bike teams of nearly 10 each, plus individual riders at the John Stanford Center for this year’s bike-to-work month.
  • Whittier had 155 (with about 4 or 5 unicycles)!
  • I’m so jealous!!  We had 7 at Denny!  SO SAD!!!  I am thinking MSP testing and being a Wednesday didn’t help but man I was disappointed :(  But I’m gonna keep trying!
  • Laurelhurst Elementary had 121 kiddos bike/unicycle today. We have about 430 students in the school. They all loved the treats and stickers. What a beautiful day – who ordered the weather for the event?  :-)
  • Stevens Elementary counted more than 100 bikes yesterday! (101 to be exact.) One of them was a tandem, too.

The lesson from Bike to School? We need to keep supporting our kids with ever safer streets for walking and biking to school.

If people riding bikes act as the “canary in the coal mine” as indicators of a safe, healthy city, kids on bikes are the bright song of that canary.

Listen!

photo-16

JSIS Bike Train May 7 2014

Stats from Walk.Bike.School for May 7 2014

  1. Bryant K-5                            200+
  2. Whittier K-5                          155
  3. Alki ElementaryK-5            150
  4. Salmon Bay K-8                 136
  5. Laurelhurst K-5                  121
  6. McDonald K-5                    120
  7. Stevens K-5                        101
  8. JSIS K-5                                91
  9. Pacific Crest K-5                 70
  10. Eckstein 6-8                        49

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