Tag Archive: family biking

Spoke & Food Benefits SNGreenways 7/28/15

Bike with your friends & family to your favorite restaurants to benefit Seattle Neighborhood Greenways on Tuesday, July 28 from 5 to 9 p.m. (riding your bike is not a requirement for participation in this fun evening charity event).

Click on the poster to let us know you plan to attend.
Spoke & Food poster

12 Great Reasons to Bike to Dinner!

Bike and dine at one or more of the many great Seattle area restaurants or breweries that will each donate 20% of their total sales from the evening to this year’s event beneficiary, the non-profit road safety group Seattle Neighborhood Greenways.

Ballard (North) – Barking Dog Alehouse
Ballard (South) – Maritime Pacific Brewery
Capitol Hill – Canterbury Alehouse
Fremont – Fremont Brewery
Greenlake – Lucia
Greenwood – RAZZI’s Pizzeria
Interbay/Magnolia – Highliner Public House
Northgate – The Watershed Pub & Kitchen
Ravenna – Vios Café at Third Place Books
Seward Park – Flying Squirrel Pizza
West Seattle – The Westy
White Center – Proletariat Pizza

Event Co-sponsors include Whole Foods, Kinetic Sports Rehab, Queen Anne Eye Clinic, New Roots Organic, and Gregg’s Cycle.

Seattle Neighborhood Greenways is your safe street advocacy coalition representing 20 local neighborhood groups across Seattle. Volunteers in each neighborhood plan and advocate for safe and comfortable streets connecting people to the places they want to go. Volunteers lend their support to citywide projects including Vision Zero, Safe Routes to School, Pavement to Parks, Complete Streets, and Memorial Walks.

Right-of-Way Declaration of Independence & Bill of Rights

Cathy Tuttle
July 4 2015
Cross-posted with The Urbanist

Declaration of Right of Way Rights

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all people are created equal, whether they are rich or poor, black or white, young or old, and that we are endowed with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

  1. We the people recognize that the ownership or use of a private vehicle does not imply the sole ownership of the public Right-of-Way.
  2. We recognize that there is no such thing as free parking, and that our collective community pays to subsidize free car storage on our public Right-of-Way.
  3. We recognize the rights of people, in particular our most vulnerable elders and children, to freely walk on and across our public Right-of-Way without fear of injury or death by people in moving vehicles.
  4. We recognize that when separated sidewalks are provided as part of the Right-of-Way, they must be wide, uncluttered by street poles and furnishings, and minimally punctuated by driveways in order to be functional for people who walk.
  5. We recognize that people riding bicycles have the right of way on our streets, and that the movement of people on bikes, particularly families riding bikes, shall not be limited on our Right-of-Ways unless their movements represent a danger or obstruction to people walking.
  6. We recognize every public Right-of-Way that does not provide separated sidewalks and protected bike lanes is a place where “cars are guests” and where people who drive should go no faster than three times average walking speed (ten miles per hour).
  7. We recognize the highest and best use we can have for our vehicles, our Rights-of-Way, and our fossil fuels, that are all subsidized by our common wealth, is to move our goods, provide emergency services, and provide transport for our most vulnerable people.
  8. We recognize that our public Rights-of-Way are maintained through extraordinary investments of our collective energy and capital.
  9. We recognize we have built more public Right-of-Way than we will be able to maintain in the future.
  10. We recognize that we live on a finite planet with limited resources and that the fuels and battery energy needed to power our vehicles is heavily subsidized with our collective money.
  11. We recognize we are at the start of a centuries long climate crisis, and that every opportunity to maximize tree planting on the forty percent of our city land that is currently paved is an investment that future generations will thank us for.
  12. We recognize the potential for beauty, gathering space, and places for people in our public Right-of-Way.

 

Seattle Comprehensive Plan 2035

Cathy Tuttle June 24, 2015
(published originally in The Urbanist on 6/17/15)

Northwest Seattle Mode split expectations Seattle 2035.

Northwest Seattle Mode Split Expectations Seattle 2035

A week ago I sat down after work in a Pioneer Square pub with five young men to discuss the Transportation Element and Transportation Appendix of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Seattle 2035, Seattle’s Comprehensive Plan for growth over the next 20 years. Read the rest of this entry »

10 Ways You Can Help Move Seattle For Our Kids

Safe Routes Walk HomeWe need YOU to speak for increasing funding for Safe Routes To School in the proposed $930 million transportation levy. This is our best chance to make all schools safe to walk and bike in the next nine years.

Councilmembers will discuss the Levy in Committee until June 23, when it will go to the full Council for a vote. So act quickly!

Here are 10 ways you can help get money for Safe Routes To School in the next few weeks:

  1. June 2nd: Speak for two minutes at the Public Hearing on Tuesday June 2 5:30pm. City Hall.
  2. Stand behind someone who is bravely speaking up for a Move Seattle Levy for Our Kids on Tuesday.
  3. Join the KIdical Mass Ride to City Hall on June 2 4pm at South Lake Union Park.
  4. Call individual City Councilmembers you might know (phone numbers here).
  5. Read about why we think Move Seattle For Our Kids is so important.
  6. Send email to the Council council@seattle.gov
  7. Send snail mail (yes! this is great! especially with kids artwork)
  8. Write a blog post about Safe Routes for Kids and post it on social media listing the Council.
  9. Talk to parents at your PTSA or on the playground about taking action.
  10. Donate to Seattle Neighborhood Greenways to support our outreach & advocacy work.

We’re actually pretty pleased that we’ve influenced so much investment into walking and biking safely along our corridors and in our neighborhoods in the Move Seattle Levy. We need just a little more to Move Seattle For Our Kids.

Thank you!

Small Fixes, Big Wins In Ballard

Cathy Tuttle
April 23, 2015

Newly installed Leary & NW 43rd Bike Signal

Newly installed Leary & NW 43rd Bike Signal

Small fixes can mean big wins!

Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) just added a new, safer connection across Leary Way near the 6th Ave NW corridor.

Connecting 6th Ave NW to the Burke Gilman Trail and to the existing Ballard Greenway is the top priority for Greenways groups in City Council District 6 that covers Fremont and Ballard.

The push-button signal for people on bikes is placed near popular destinations including Hale’s Ales Brewery, Fred Meyer, and the Burke Gilman Trail.

The new push button will help families going to the proposed 6th Ave NW Safe Route to Schools corridor connecting Pacific Crest Elementary, West Woodland Elementary, and Greenwood Elementary Schools, say Ballard Greenways advocates.

The project for signs and signal changes was funded by a Neighborhood Park and Street Fund application submitted in 2014 by Fremont Greenways. Thank you!

What Astonished Us About Bike To School Day Was Way More Than Numbers

JSIS Bike to School Day May 7 2014

JSIS Bike to School Day May 7 2014

Today the Census Bureau released its newest report on commuting in America. There’s been a 60 percent increase in bike commuting in America over the past decade. Portland is #1 at 6.1%, and Seattle ranks #5 at 3.4%.

You need to know the trip to work is all this report tracks and trip to work is the tip of the bicycle iceberg. Almost twice as many of our trips are to the gym, the grocery store, the movie theater, and taking our kids to school.

We don’t measure these trips nearly as well as we should. And because we don’t measure, we don’t build the safe, family-friendly streets to support these trips either. That is about to change in Seattle.

We did do a little measurement on the May 7 2014 Bike to School Day.  It was an awesome display of kid power, family power, and community power. The excitement and pride as reports rolled in from all over Seattle was breathtaking.

Just a little energy from the Walk.Bike.Schools! blog:

  • We counted 136 bikes in the Salmon Bay K-8 Bike Alley, and that number doesn’t even include all of the skateboards, scooters, roller blades, and kids on foot that we saw. Impossible to know for sure, but our full tally is probably around 160 arriving by kid-powered modes of transportation.
  • At Eckstein Middle we have 49 today. We consider that a huge success, as we are still trying to crack the middle school code (how do those brains work, anyway?). If you have ideas, let us know.
  • We’re tracking numbers here at Cascade…up to 1315 so far for elementary and K-8 students and 93 at middle schools.  Shout out to newcomers on the Bike to School scene…Lowell Elementary with 25 students, McDonald International with 120, Pacific Crest with 70, and Whitman Middle School with 36!  SPS Superintendent Jose Banda led one of two bike trains to Alki Elementary this morning with more than 150 people on bikes!
  • I’m pretty sure we had our biggest “Bike to School Day Doughnut Ride” ever at Bryant. Our best-guess count is 200+ riders (parents and kids). That’s a lot of potential mayhem but everything went smoothly and everyone remained rubber-side down. Phew!
  • At John Stanford International School we had a bike train of 91! (That includes a couple scooters). Counting bikes and scooters (tho only a handful were scooters) on the racks, fences, and trees after the bell rang yielded 94, but that doesn’t count the many trailer biked kids and bikes that don’t stick around so probably it’s really a tad higher. Awesome day!
  • With all these students as inspiration, we have 4 Seattle Public School administration bike teams of nearly 10 each, plus individual riders at the John Stanford Center for this year’s bike-to-work month.
  • Whittier had 155 (with about 4 or 5 unicycles)!
  • I’m so jealous!!  We had 7 at Denny!  SO SAD!!!  I am thinking MSP testing and being a Wednesday didn’t help but man I was disappointed :(  But I’m gonna keep trying!
  • Laurelhurst Elementary had 121 kiddos bike/unicycle today. We have about 430 students in the school. They all loved the treats and stickers. What a beautiful day – who ordered the weather for the event?  :-)
  • Stevens Elementary counted more than 100 bikes yesterday! (101 to be exact.) One of them was a tandem, too.

The lesson from Bike to School? We need to keep supporting our kids with ever safer streets for walking and biking to school.

If people riding bikes act as the “canary in the coal mine” as indicators of a safe, healthy city, kids on bikes are the bright song of that canary.

Listen!

photo-16

JSIS Bike Train May 7 2014

Stats from Walk.Bike.School for May 7 2014

  1. Bryant K-5                            200+
  2. Whittier K-5                          155
  3. Alki ElementaryK-5            150
  4. Salmon Bay K-8                 136
  5. Laurelhurst K-5                  121
  6. McDonald K-5                    120
  7. Stevens K-5                        101
  8. JSIS K-5                                91
  9. Pacific Crest K-5                 70
  10. Eckstein 6-8                        49

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