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Vision Zero Tops List Of 2015 Greenway Priorities

vision zero seattleBy Cathy Tuttle
November 24, 2014

In November 2014, SNG leaders representing 16 different local groups gathered for their 4th annual fall Prioritization discussion. We’ve had huge success every year as we collectively choose 10 priorities for SNG leaders to support in the following year. Vision Zero easily topped our 2015 list.

We’ll be dedicated this year to making sure all of these priorities are supported and implemented. Our 2015 Priorities are as follows:

    • Vision Zero. Advocate for strong local and city support for engineered speed reduction, enforcement, education, and more. See the New York’s Transportation Alternatives Vision Zero Principles. Join the Vision Zero Seattle Facebook community.
    • Seattle Transportation Levy. Improve funding for active transportation and get out the votes for a citywide funding package as Bridging the Gap expires in 2015.
    • Complete Streets. Make sure our own Complete Streets Ordinance is enforced. Make sure SDOT improvement projects are funded and tied to walk/bike safety improvements. (we’ll also be closely following the development of the Pedestrian Master Plan as it is updated this year.)

Council District Priorities

  • District 1: 35th Ave SW safe intersections  and parallel greenways
  • District 2: Speed reduction and traffic calming on Rainier Ave S and MLK Way S
  • District 3: SR520. Make walk/bike access work for local neighborhoods around SR520.
  • District 4: Wallingford Greenway. Make this “greenway” corridor functional and meet current City standards from Stone Way N & N 43rd, along N 44th . Plan connection to future light rail station on 43rd & Brooklyn NE.
  • District 5: Fund design and early implementation of a N/NW 92nd St. greenway as it crosses both Aurora and I-5 with direct links to Wilson Pacific, North Seattle College, and future Northgate light rail.
  • District 6: 6th Ave NW corridor N-S with particular focus on  6th & NW 65th intersection and BGT connection.
    • District 7: TBD with discussion between Queen Anne Greenways and First Hill Improvement Association.

I lived in Sweden for a whole year with my family, in 2006-2007, studying sustainable city design. I was fortunate to be a part of the discussion of Vision Zero, officially adopted as a national Swedish transportation policy in 2007.

I like this description of Vision Zero by a Swedish expert: “People make mistakes.. so let’s create a system for the humans instead of trying to adjust the humans to the system.” Safe streets are a real possibility when we collectively decide safe street engineering, enforcement, and education are worth spending time and resources on. We at Seattle Neighborhood Greenways (SNG) support the culture of Vision Zero and are thrilled this is now becoming embedded in our City, other active transportation advocacy organizations, and in the public at large.

Leaders of many SNG groups meet to discuss priorities for 2015

Leaders of many SNG groups meet to discuss priorities for 2015

 

Jake Makes the Case for Vision Zero

Jake Vanderplas. Madison Vigil Walk August 2013

Jake Vanderplas. Madison Vigil Walk August 2013

November 22, 2014
By Cathy Tuttle

This is a story of how community activism, police, courts, the press, and engineering have worked together to make our streets safer.

Jake Vanderplas is an sweet, caring man. He lives in West Seattle, and as a student decided the best thing for his health, wallet, community, and environment would be to bike commute daily between West Seattle and the UW. (He’s smart too — he really is an astrophysicist.)

A few years ago Jake realized he could make his commute and his community a lot safer if greenways came to West Seattle.

Jake and Stu Hennessey (another sweet, caring man who owns Alki Bike and Board), formed West Seattle Greenways and started leading scouting and policy bike rides around neighborhood streets trying to map out the most connected, least hilly routes through some pretty challenging geography.

I had the pleasure of going on some of these slow rides: with Stu on a Spokespeople Ride and Jake on a policy ride showing potential greenway routes to City Councilmembers, SDOT, and local business people.

As part of our Seattle Neighborhood Greenways coalition, Jake was able to advocate for the Delridge Greenway. Jake also joined his North Delridge Neighborhood Council to be a good citizen and to help smooth the way for a greenway through the community. In many ways Jake’s path to greenways followed that of other local leaders of our 20+ local groups.

Jake also is a regular participant and organizer of Memorial Walks and Bike Rides and was a lead organizer of the Memorial Ride for Sher Kung. Jake’s photo here is from our Vigil Walk he attended in Madison Park.

So it was particularly ironic when Jake was attacked by a woman speeding on the Delridge Greenway. His actual assault happened later, on SW Andover & 26th SW. The West Seattle Blog describes the crime:

“The investigation indicated that Soerensen had first passed Vanderplas “at a high rate of speed” while northbound on 26th SW, a neighborhood-greenway street; he then passed her, and after following him at 20 mph for several blocks, repeatedly honking her horn, she swerved into Vanderplas, who suffered a hand injury, and then she drove away; police tracked her down about a week later. As noted in charging documents, her 2002 Nissan Sentra “has a curb weight of 2,519 pounds” while Vanderplas’s 2007 Schwinn LeTour bicycle weighs about 30 pounds.”

Because it was a hit and run assault, Jake used a letter to the Seattle Bike Blog as one way to help the police identify and track down his assailant. The police found and charged the assailant, King County Superior Court took the case to trial, and yesterday, the jury upheld the charges of second-degree assault. Sentencing will happen early next year.

What is extraordinary about this case, in addition to Jake being a safe streets advocate with Seattle Neighborhood Greenways, is the outcome. Jake is back on his bike when many who’ve been struck face a lifetime of rehabilitation. Many hit-and-runs remain unsolved, while the police were able to solve this crime. In this case, police charged the assailant, while in too many cases, even people who have killed with their cars receive only a small ticket. And the King County Superior Court was willing to take and successfully prosecute this case.

We need the police and courts to reliably do their jobs and to be a deterrent to traffic violence as they have in Jake’s case.

We also need our streets engineered to not allow deadly mistakes. Intersections where “the sun was in my eyes”, “it was too dark”, and “it was confusing and I didn’t see her” are places where different modes must be separated, slowed, and signaled.

All of our systems, police, courts, engineering, health and education, and the press need to work together with the community to make our streets safer. In short, we need Vision Zero.

PARK(ing) Day Makes Places for People

September 22, 2014
Cathy Tuttle, Seattle Neighborhood Greenways Executive Director

I LOVE PARK(ing) Day! This nationally celebrated civic holiday fully embodies the foundation of Seattle Neighborhood Greenways: Streets really are places for people.

This year I traveled with a few friends to about 30 of the 50 PARK(ing) Day spaces open 9-3 on September 19. It’s worth noting that our local Greenways-affiliated groups stepped up this year to be part of teams to build 10 of those 50 PARK(ing) spaces.

Seattle Neighborhood Greenways groups converted the highly trafficked bridge over Ravenna Park at 15th Ave NE from a four-lane road into a two-laner with biking and walking paths on either side.

Seattle Neighborhood Greenways groups converted the highly trafficked bridge over Ravenna Park at 15th Ave NE from a four-lane road into a two-laner with biking and walking paths on either side.

I didn’t have time to go as far north as Lake City or as far south as Bike Works — and we missed the West Seattle Bike Connections setup in front of Husky Deli too — but from Ballard to Broadway, Ravenna Park to the I-District, people around Seattle figured out how to turn asphalt into a malleable medium of joyful public space.

Here are some highlights:
Re-imagineering the Street. All PARK(ing) Day spots take up public right-of-way. Cascade Bicycle Club and Seattle Neighborhood Greenways took a LOT of right-of-way and turned whole streets into places.

Cascade Bike Club also grabbed a street South Lake Union and successfully turned it into two lanes of traffic and a two-way protected bike lane for the day. Re-engineering streets for PARK(ing) Day might become a whole lot more popular in future years. Hope so!

Cascade Bike Club also grabbed a street South Lake Union and successfully turned it into two lanes of traffic and a two-way protected bike lane for the day. Re-engineering streets for PARK(ing) Day might become a whole lot more popular in future years. Hope so!

Seattle Neighborhood Greenways groups University Greenways and NE Seattle Greenways, closed a little-used connector street and converted the highly trafficked bridge over Ravenna Park at 15th Ave NE from a four-lane road into a two-laner with biking and walking paths on either side.

The full story is in this post about the bridge conversion and how it impressed our new SDOT Director Scott Kubly and SDOT Traffic Engineer Dongho Chang so much they are talking about making some of the changes permanent.

Books Belong on the Street. People like to read in public and Seattle is a literate city. Let’s celebrate that! Seattle Public Librarians read banned books in Belltown. Little Free Libraries featured prominently in several PARK(ing) Day pop-ups. Plenty of book give-aways including this setup designed by Schemata Workshop in front of Eltana Bagels in Capitol Hill with books provided by Elliot Bay Bookstore. Here, Tom Fucoloro of Seattle Bike Blog and Kelli Refer, author of Pedal Stretch Breathe take a blogging/reading break.

Schemata Workshop designed spot in front of Eltana Bagels in Capitol Hill with books provided by Elliot Bay Bookstore. Here, Tom Fucoloro of Seattle Bike Blog and Kelli Refer, author of Pedal Stretch Breathe take a blogging/reading break.

Schemata Workshop designed spot in front of Eltana Bagels in Capitol Hill with books provided by Elliot Bay Bookstore. Here, Tom Fucoloro of Seattle Bike Blog and Kelli Refer, author of Pedal Stretch Breathe take a blogging/reading break.

We Want to Play in the Street. Games, photos booths, fun. We love to play in the street at every age. Girls on the Run was one of several playful pop-ups in South Lake Union. Participants who “ran around mini-Green Lake” were awarded a chocolate medal.

Girls on the Run was one of several playful pop-ups in South Lake Union.

Girls on the Run was one of several playful pop-ups in South Lake Union.

People Like to Sit in Funky Furniture. Tom Fucoloro takes another blogging break, sitting here on the mini-golf course designed by Atelier Drome. Read Tom’s PARK(ing) Day report on Seattle Bike Blog.

Tom Fucoloro blogging on the mini-golf course designed by Atelier Drome.

Tom Fucoloro blogging on the mini-golf course designed by Atelier Drome.

The Unbearable Longing for Green. Most all PARK(ing) Day spots tried to add a touch of green. Many ended up with scraggly potted plants and pots of petunias. No one did green better than HBB Landscape Architecture. Their staff created three rooms, representing three planted zones found in Western Washington. Kelli and I walked through this double parking spot oasis a handful of times. We’d step off the sidewalk and into the pop-up and each time felt the pull of the ferns, a hint of the wind in the trees, and we’d instantly relax. We need more beautiful wild biodiversity all over Seattle.

HBB Landscape Architecture created three rooms, representing three planted zones found in Western Washington.

HBB Landscape Architecture created three rooms, representing three planted zones found in Western Washington.

Healthy Streets Build Healthy Businesses 10 Ways. We’re guessing many of the businesses that extended into the street on PARK(ing) Day 2014 will be eager to be part of the parklet program by next year. In fact, Molly Moon’s Ice Cream in Wallingford launched their new parklet on this PARK(ing) Day!

Jimi Hendrix-inspired, music-themed activity park in front of Pioneer Square businesses

Jimi Hendrix-inspired, music-themed activity park in front of Pioneer Square businesses

Note to Schools: Send Your Kids to Play in the Street. Another note for 2015, schools need to get into the act! From Universities to preschools, we’d love to see more schools that let children imagine the world they want and need. What better way than starting with a PARK(ing) Day pop-up with bamboo bike racks here at Salmon Bay School in Ballard?

Bamboo bike racks at Salmon Bay School in Ballard

Bamboo bike racks at Salmon Bay School in Ballard

SDOT Puts People First. Jennifer Wieland is the hard-working genius in the SDOT Public Space Management program. She coordinates Parklets, Play Streets, PARK(ing) Day and much more. Jennifer and I both started our day in the Pronto Bike Share PARK(ing) Day space on Capitol Hill.

Cathy Tuttle, Seattle Neighborhood Greenways & Jennifer Wieland, SDOT Public Space Management program at Pronto Pop-up.

Cathy Tuttle, Seattle Neighborhood Greenways & Jennifer Wieland, SDOT Public Space Management program at Pronto’s Pop-up.

New Parklets in Uptown & Wallingford!

anatomy of a parklet diagram red 2 logo

A new parklet is scheduled to open next month in Uptown near the SIFF Theater on Queen Anne Avenue North.

VIA’s Community Design Studio has crafted a beautiful pro bono design, allowing another active street to have a tiny but mighty space dedicated to people.

The Seattle Parklet Program is invigorating already active commercial streets with new public places for people to gather and sit a while.

The newest parklet to grace Seattle just opened September 21 in front of Molly Moon’s Ice Cream on N 45th St.

 

Staff and Steering Committee

Seattle Neighborhood Greenways is a grassroots organization where representatives from our neighborhood groups set priorities and elect the board.

Our Staff

 

Gordon Padelford headshot cropped

Gordon Padelford, Executive Director, believes in the potential power of local neighborhood greenways groups to transform Seattle for the better. He got involved with SNG through volunteering with his local group, Central Seattle Greenways, where he coordinated the SR 520 campaign and organized the 2013 Livable Streets Mayoral Forum. Every week Gordon is inspired by the positive impact community members are making in their neighborhoods, and comes to work everyday excited to bolster their efforts and cultivate the safe streets movement in Seattle.

 

Susan Gleason headshot

Susan Gleason, Communications and Development Director, comes to Seattle Neighborhood Greenways after over fourteen years at Yes! Magazine. Susan loves our vision of community living, where we (people of all backgrounds and abilities) can move easily and comfortably in our neighborhoods — where neighbors meet and greet each other, where kids can ride bikes and play safely, where the natural environment can thrive. She’s known for her extensive knowledge of storytelling, passion, and infectious smile.

 

 

We’re hiring a Community Organizer!

 

Our Board

Barbara Gordon
Bob Anderton
Cathy Tuttle
David Goldberg
Daigoro Toyama
Edwin Rios
Janine Blaeloch, President
Mark Ostrow, Treasurer
Merlin Rainwater
Michael Herschensohn, Vice President
Troy Heerwagen, Secretary

Our Founding Donors

The following people have helped build on our momentum by making the first ever tax-deductible financial gifts to Seattle Neighborhood Greenways in December 2012. Thank you! 

  • Aaron Solorzano
  • Andres Salomon
  • Andrew Sheridan
  • Anne Gantt
  • Anonymous
  • Anthony and Becca Aue
  • Barbara Gordon
  • Ben Truelove
  • Beryl Fernandes
  • Bill Bradburd
  • Bob Edmiston and Lee Anne Caylor
  • Brendan Patrick
  • Brett Allen
  • Bruce Myers
  • Caitlin Kehoe
  • Cat Howell and Mike Ernst
  • Cathy Tuttle and David Notkin
  • Chris Gurdjian
  • Chris Langer
  • Chris Saleeba
  • Christian Silk
  • Clint Loper
  • Cynthia May
  • Daniel Weise
  • Dawn and Chris Hemminger
  • Dave Rodgers
  • Denis Martynowych
  • Devor Barton
  • Eli Goldberg
  • Elta and Warren Ratliff in honor of Michael Herschensohn and Cathy Tuttle
  • Evan Manvel
  • Frank Fay & Nicole Provost
  • Gordon Padelford
  • Greg Linden
  • Hannah Hickey
  • Janine Blaeloch
  • Jarrett Johnson
  • Jeff Hummel
  • Jennifer Litowski
  • Jim Walseth
  • Joan Weiser
  • Jon Gunther
  • Julia Field
  • Julian Davies
  • Julie Medero
  • Juliette and David Delfs
  • Kevin Hanchett
  • Madeleine Carlson
  • Maria and Jed Kaufman
  • Marina Gordon and Jeffrey Linn
  • Merlin Rainwater
  • Michael and Wendy Wolf
  • Michael Herschensohn
  • Michael Kennedy
  • Michael Snyder
  • Miki Nishihata
  • Muriel Lawty
  • Nancy Blase
  • Norm Tjaden
  • Quentin King and Glen Kriekenbeck
  • Rich Knox
  • Robert Hall
  • Robin Randels
  • Ron Sher
  • Ruth Anderson
  • Councilmember Sally Bagshaw and Brad Bagshaw
  • Scott Carlson
  • Scott Kralik
  • Skip Slavin
  • Stanley Yee
  • Steve Durrant
  • Steven Greenberg
  • Stu Hennessey
  • Teresa Damaske
  • Toby Thaler
  • Tom Fucoloro
  • Whit and Beth Hamlin
  • *Amgen Foundation
  • *GE Foundation
  • *Microsoft Matching Gifts
  • *MSNBC
  • *Ordinary People Foundation
  • *Seattle Foundation

DONATE TODAY!

My $1,500 gift = $3,000

My $500 gift = $1,000

My $150 gift = $300

My $50 gift = $100

My $25 gift = $50

Was it just a year ago that we first started to imagine a city connected by safe, family-friendly streets where our children and families could walk and bike to school–and live happy, healthy lives?

And what an incredible year it has been! Through everyone’s hard work, this dream is now being cemented as Seattle’s actual transportation policy. The transformation we’ve brought about is unprecedented, and has received national recognition. I am grateful and inspired by every one of you.

But next year, kids and families all over Delridge and Ballard will be the first to have networks of safe, healthy streets. These streets will make it possible to people of all ages, incomes and abilities to get around their neighborhoods.

Make no mistake: Seattle Neighborhood Greenways is at a crossroads. We’ve accomplished so much in our first year–you’ll find just a sampling at the end of this e-mail.

But we can do so much more as a sustainable, funded organization. Right now, our main financial support has come from a single, generous donor. I know many of you are passionate about Greenways, but haven’t yet had a chance to contribute your time or money.

If you support the dream of a Seattle where our families and loved ones can safely walk and bike: please make a end-of-year donation to Seattle Neighborhood Greenways. No matter the amount–whether $25 or $2500–we value your participation.

Our steering committee’s ambitious plans for 2013 and beyond will only be possible with your broad financial support. You can make a tax-deductible donation today through our fiscal sponsor Seattle Parks Foundation. And for a limited time, your donation will be matched. DONATE TODAY! for a future of safe, healthy streets.

With gratitude,

Cathy Tuttle
Executive Director, Seattle Neighborhood Greenways

2012: A Greenways Year in Review

  • Fifteen of our 19 neighborhood groups have crowdsourced maps that have been incorporated into the current draft of the Bicycle Master Plan.
  • We’ve collectively identified priority routes and intersections to develop through Bridging the Gap funding.
  • We’ve built up the Rainier Valley Greenways group into a powerful force with competitive grants from the Office of Sustainability & Environment and the National Parks Service.
  • We’ve formed a powerful coalition to address pedestrian and bicycle access of the SR 520 Bridge remodel.
  • We have major projects being reviewed for Safe Routes to School funding, and four of our groups received Large Street Fund support (and many more groups have raised money through Department of Neighborhoods, private sources, and major foundations).
  • We’ve made major presentations to Seattle Public Schools, City Council, Senior Services of Seattle/King County, Seattle Parks, and the Office of Emergency Management.
  • We recently received Sustainable Seattle’s highest award for Leadership in Livable & Human Infrastructure.
  • We’ve made safe and healthy Seattle streets into front-page news through television coverage, dozens of newspaper articles, and presentations at regional and international transportation conferences.
  • We’ve partnered with Seattle Parks Foundation as our 501c(3) sponsor, making all of your gifts to Seattle Neighborhood Greenways tax-deductible as well as a pleasure to give.
  • The most important thing we’ve done in the past year is empower thousands of people in Seattle to envision and advocate for streets that are safe and healthy for their communities. Thank you! Donate today to keep that energy going!

A Greenways Year in Review–and an exciting announcement!

What an incredible couple of years it has been! Through everyone’s hard work, this dream is now being cemented as Seattle’s actual transportation policy. The transformation we’ve brought about is unprecedented, and has received national recognition. I am grateful and inspired by every one of you.

Akiva, age 10, gets ready to ride in Seattle

Personally, I became involved in bicycle advocacy in 2008 when my son Akiva was 10. I wondered whether he would be able to experience the freedom of bicycling from our home in Wallingford to Roosevelt High School. Akiva is now a high school freshman, and he still can’t bike to school safely.

But next year, kids and families all over Delridge and Ballard will be the first to have networks of safe, healthy streets. These streets will make it possible to people of all ages, incomes and abilities to get around their neighborhoods.

Make no mistake: Seattle Neighborhood Greenways is at a crossroads. We’ve accomplished so much in our first year–you’ll find just a sampling at the end of this e-mail.

But we can do so much more as a sustainable, funded organization. Right now, our main financial support has come from a single, generous donor. I know many of you are passionate about Greenways, but haven’t yet had a chance to contribute your time or money.

If you support the dream of a Seattle where our families and loved ones can safely walk and bike: please make a end-of-year donation to Seattle Neighborhood Greenways. No matter the amount–whether $25 or $2500–we value your participation.

Our steering committee’s ambitious plans for 2013 and beyond will only be possible with your broad financial support. You can make a tax-deductible donation today through our fiscal sponsor Seattle Parks Foundation. And for a limited time, your donation will be matched. DONATE TODAY! for a future of safe, healthy streets.

With gratitude,

Cathy Tuttle
Executive Director, Seattle Neighborhood Greenways

2013: A Greenways Year in Review

  • Fifteen of our 19 neighborhood groups have crowdsourced maps that have been incorporated into the current draft of the Bicycle Master Plan.
  • We’ve collectively identified priority routes and intersections to develop through Bridging the Gap funding.
  • We’ve built up the Rainier Valley Greenways group into a powerful force with competitive grants from the Office of Sustainability & Environment and the National Parks Service.
  • We’ve formed a powerful coalition to address pedestrian and bicycle access of the SR 520 Bridge remodel.
  • We have major projects being reviewed for Safe Routes to School funding, and four of our groups received Large Street Fund support (and many more groups have raised money through Department of Neighborhoods, private sources, and major foundations).
  • We’ve made major presentations to Seattle Public Schools, City Council, Senior Services of Seattle/King County, Seattle Parks, and the Office of Emergency Management.
  • We recently received Sustainable Seattle’s highest award for Leadership in Livable & Human Infrastructure.
  • We’ve made safe and healthy Seattle streets into front-page news through television coverage, dozens of newspaper articles, and presentations at regional and international transportation conferences.
  • We’ve partnered with Seattle Parks Foundation as our 501c(3) sponsor, making all of your gifts to Seattle Neighborhood Greenways tax-deductible as well as a pleasure to give.
  • The most important thing we’ve done in the past year is empower thousands of people in Seattle to envision and advocate for streets that are safe and healthy for their communities. Thank you! Donate today to keep that energy going!

Critical Lass

WHO: Women (children welcome) interested in easy, social bike rides
WHEN: Sunday May 13th, 2012 (2:00 PM)
WHERE: Ballard Library
5614 22nd Ave NW, Seattle, WA Directions
RSVP: Please RSVP on Facebook

Come to Seattle’s first Critical Lass bicycle ride! An easy, social bicycle ride for ladies lasting 45 minutes to an hour, with time for stopping to take photos and chat. READ an article and see photos from the ride at http://www.ballardnewstribune.com/2012/05/14/features/riding-reporter-dozens-come-out-first-seattle

Montlake

Who Are We?

Montlake Greenways is a group of neighbors like you who are working to make their streets safer and more comfortable for everybody.

Area: The Montlake Greenways effort includes the areas bounded by North Capitol Hill (Interlaken), I5 to the west, Lake Washington Blvd to the East and the water to the north. It’s basically the Montlake Elementary school district.

Mission: The currently under served group that most needs Neighborhood Greenways in the Montlake area is the 70% of the population who would like to walk or bike to local destinations but does not feel safe doing so given the safety limitations of the current public right of way infrastructure.

Get Involved!

The best way to get involved is to sign up in the form below (or using this link). Welcome!

You can also follow us online:

Our Victories

  • We have worked extensively to ensure the SR-520 interchange and Portage Bay Bridge can be crossed comfortably and safely by people of all ages and abilities. And we have had significant success!
  • Crowd sourced mapping: We scouted and identified a crowd-sourced map of important walking and biking routes (see map below)

Proposed circulation plan for the communities around Portage Bay:

View Montlake Destination Based Planning in a larger map

MAP LEGEND

Solid Green Line: Completed Greenway
Translucent Green: In progress/Greenway Funded
Red: Priority 1 Greenways to build next
Red Pin: Priority 1 intersections to build next
Narrow Purple Lines: Potential Greenway Routes (subject to change)
Purple Points: Potential Greenway intersection treatments
Wide Blue Lines: Cycle tracks and other expensive Low Stress infrastructure recommended

Green Lake

Green Lake Greenways Kick-Off meeting 5-28-13

Who Are We?

Green Lake Greenways is a group of neighbors like you who are working to make their streets safer and more comfortable for everybody.

Get Involved!

The best way to get involved is to sign up in the form below (or using this link). Welcome!

 

You can also follow us online:

Get involved or learn more about our top 2016 priority to create family friendly crossings of I-5.

Our Victories

  • Safe Routes to School Mapping: See our Scouting Route of Green Lake to Lake Union Trail that identified key impediments to kids safely getting to school.
  • Seattle’s Bicycle Master Plan: Seattle adopted 95% of our crowd sourced knowledge into Seattle’s Bicycle Master Plan.
  • Crowd sourced mapping: We scouted and identified a crowd-sourced map of important walking and biking routes (see map below)

 


View Green Lake Greenway Routes in a larger map

Solid Green: Completed greenway (Label: “Completed”, 100% opacity, 10pt line)
Translucent Green: Greenways funded/under construction (Label: “In progress”, 45% opacity, 10pt line)
Red: Priority 1 greenway to build next (Label:”P1″, 45% opacity, 10pt line)
Red Pin: Priority 1 intersection treatments to build next (Labeled “P1”)
Narrow Purple Lines: Potential Greenway Routes (subject to change and duplication, 45% opacity, 5 pt)
Purple Points: Potential Greenway intersection treatments
Wide Blue Lines: Cycle tracks and other expensive infrastructure (45% opacity, 10pt line)

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