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SR-520 Design Resolution Improved!

Gordon Padelford
October 9, 2015

Designing better walking and biking connections as part of the SR-520 project is our 2015 District 3 priority.SR-520 desire lines

Exciting news! The new SR-520 interchanges will be easier to walk and bike across. 

In January of this year we sent a consensus letter detailing what needed to change with the SR-520 interchange design to make it safer to walk and bike across.

Then in September we issued a call to action to testify at a City Council hearing to improve a resolution on the proposed design. And you rose to the occasion! You packed the public hearing and we got the message across that we needed a stronger resolution to specifically address:

  1. Safer ways to walk across the Montalke Interchange
  2. Protected bike lanes on Montlake Blvd
  3. A neighborhood greenway on the Lake Washington Loop

O'Brien at City CouncilWith this momentum we worked with Councilmember Mike O’Brien to propose amendments to the the resolution addressing these concerns. Thanks to his leadership and support from other councilmembers amendments to address walking across the Montlake Interchange and biking on Montlake Blvd were approved unanimously! While an amendment to include a neighborhood greenway on the Lake Washington Loop was not put forward, it did raise the profile of project significantly and funds from the Neighborhood Park and Street Fund were allocated to help study the project.

These amendments helped strengthen an already excellent resolution, so now we can truly look forward to a project that reconnects instead of further dividing our neighborhoods.

Thank you to all to the many people made this victory possible!

Specifically we would like to thank Councilmembers Mike O’Brien, Tom Rasmussen, and Kshama Sawant; our local greenway organizers Mike Archambault, Lionel Job, Bob Edmiston, Jerry Fulks, Drew Dresman, Forrest Baum, Brie Gyncild, and Merlin Rainwater; our healthy transportation allies Brock Howell, Kelli Refer, Andrew Austin, Kristi Rennebohm Franz, and the Connect Seattle members who turned out at the hearing. We would also like to thank Andrew Glass-Hasting and Lyle Bicknell for their work making this project work for all people. Thank you.

SR-520 Resolution Needs to be Better

Gordon Padelford
September 10, 2015

montlake blvd interchange

The 520 Montlake Interchange will be a formidable obstacle

The SR-520 and the Montlake Bridge area is one of Seattle’s key geographic chokepoints for walking and biking.

The $1.64 billion SR-520 highway project will be set in concrete for the next eighty years. It must work.

The Seattle City Council has released a draft resolution outlining the City’s official position on how to improve the design.

While there is a lot to like in the draft resolution, unfortunately the current SR520 Draft Resolution does not include the top three needed fixes outlined in a letter sent to the city seven months ago by a coalition of community and healthy transportation groups:

1. Single lane on-ramps and raised crosswalks at the Montlake interchange so that people can safely walk across.
2. Protected bike lanes on Montlake Blvd to allow people to safely bike through the interchange.
3. A neighborhood greenway along the Lake Washington Loop paid for by WSDOT, to provide a key link in the non-motorized system, and protect the neighborhood’s quality of life by mitigating cut-through traffic.

Here’s how you can make an impact

Show up and tell the Seattle City Council we need to get this right at a public hearing at the University Christian Church at 4731 15th Ave. NE, on Wednesday Sept. 16 at 5:30 p.m.

While in person testimony is an order of magnitude more impactful, if you can’t make the meeting, you can email, or better yet call, the City Council Transportation Committee Chair Tom Rasmussen directly at 206-684-8808 or tom.rasmussen@seattle.gov.

For questions or how to get more involved contact gordon <at> seattlegreenways.org
Screen Shot 2015-09-10 at 4.53.56 PM
Thank you!

District 2: Rainier Ave S

Thanks for your help in 2016! Read about what you helped accomplished.

YES! I want to learn more about how to help Rainier Ave S!

Children hurry across Rainier at S Myrtle St where a safe crossing is our budget priority!

Making children run across a deadly four lane road is not okay.

What is the problem?
Rainier Ave S is Seattle’s most dangerous street.

What is the solution (the 2016 priority)?
Make Rainier Ave S safe for people to walk and bike along and across. Expand the safety corridor project, create safe crossings and build protected bike lanes from Hillman City to Columbia City.

Who is involved?
Seattle Neighborhood Greenways is working to empower Rainier Valley Greenways and their extensive community connections.

Campaign Updates

    • Get involved: Sign our petition thanking the city for making part of Rainier Ave safer and calling for further action:

  • Get Involved: We could use your help! Let us know that you support this priority!
  • N-S Rainier Greenway: SDOT will begin building a neighborhood greenway that runs north-south through the entire Rainier Valley in 2016! We have been working to make this route as good as it can be given that SDOT has been unwilling to put protected bike lanes on Rainier Ave itself so far.
  • Accessible Mt Baker: We are actively supporting the Accessible Mt Baker proposal that would dramatically improve safety and accessibility for the northern end of the Rainier Valley. Rainier Valley Greenways is partnering with the Mt Baker Hub and Beacon Safe Streets Community group to make this become a reality.
  • Rainier Ave Safety Project: We are supporting the expansion of the successful (the data shows its working as planned) Rainier Road Safety Corridor Project.
  • Raised Crosswalks for Rainier Beach: We have submitted a proposal for improving the intersection of Henderson and Rainier Ave S which is at the heart of the Rainier Beach community. Key community destinations people must use this intersection to walk to include four schools, the library, the community center, the main neighborhood park, and the light rail station.
  • This priority builds off the momentum from our 2015 Rainier Ave campaign.
Get Well Card for Businesses Hit By Cars held by SNG staff Phyllis Porter & Gordon Padelford on Rainier Ave S

Get Well Card for Rainier Businesses Hit By Cars

Winning Campaign To Fix Seattle's Most Dangerous Street

Winning Campaign To Fix Seattle’s Most Dangerous Street

Rainier Ave S Protected Bike Lanes experiment

Hillman City to Columbia City family friendly bike lane experiment

 

Return to 2016 campaigns overview

Let’s Get Ready For #NACTO16!

Cathy Tuttle, November 4, 2015

We passed the Move Seattle Levy!!

The future of living in Seattle suddenly seems a lot more hopeful.SNG Move Seattle volunteers

We’ll be repairing bridges, repaving roads, replacing broken signals and signs. Important as it is to maintain what we have, we passed a nearly billion dollar transportation levy because we’re ready to transform Seattle, not just to maintain it.

And what better motivation to transform Seattle than NACTO 2016?

Seattle is playing host to the “Olympics” of street engineers and activists next September when NACTO (National Association of City Transportation Officials) comes to town. Since NACTO centers around walking and biking tours of the best each city has to offer, it is a perfect opportunity to ramp up our visible, transformational infrastructure.

Here are our four suggestions for what Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) can build by September 2016 in time for #NACTO16.Center City Network

  1. Center City Bike Network. Build it. All of it. All of the blue lines. Call it a pilot project, but get it done. Seattle’s current downtown bicycle infrastructure for All Ages and Abilities is an embarrassment. Let’s put our best lanes forward for NACTO.
  2. Rainier Ave South Protected Bike Lanes. If Shirley and Adam can build 2000 feet of protected bike lanes that are safe enough for a four-year-old to ride a bike on between Hillman City and Columbia City in one day with chalk, green butcher paper, and orange cones, SDOT can link up these two Rainier Valley communities this year in time for NACTO.
  3. Safe Routes to School. Let’s make sure we can take our NACTO visitors on walking tours where we’ve transformed the school walk zones around ten of our schools in historically underserved communities. We’ve got more than 100 School Walk Zones to improve to All Ages and Abilities standards. Let’s get to work!
  4. Roll out the green carpet in South Lake Union. Of course NACTO officials will want to see the beating economic heart of Seattle. Let’s make sure South Lake Union is accessible for people who walk and bike. Westlake Cycletrack is likely to be nearly complete by 2016. South Lake Union needs to connect east, west and to downtown. Can we actually show off a walking / bicycle network that knits the city together?Murray SRTS

Our local Seattle Neighborhood Greenways groups and volunteers worked hard to get the Move Seattle Levy passed. Thank you voters!

Our challenge now is to SDOT and the Mayor: We’re inviting the neighbors over to see our streets. Let’s get Seattle ready for ‪#‎NACTO16‬Now it is time get to work to quickly transform Seattle into a safe, healthy, equitable city where people can safely walk, roll, and bike.

 

PARKing Day 2015 Makes Successful Streets

Five local neighborhood groups changed their streets on a grand scale on Friday September 18.

People in Rainier, Ballard, Ravenna, Bryant and Fremont were winners of Seattle Neighborhood Greenways first annual PARK(ing) Day Design Competition.

Instead of endless public meetings, design charettes, and flat conceptual drawings, we helped these four groups build protected intersections in Ballard and Bryant, and thousands of feet of protected bike lanes in Rainier and Ravenna. Here’s a look at what happened.

Rainier Ave S Protected Bike Lanes

Rainier Ave S Protected Bike Lanes

Rainier

The Grand Prize Winner was an ambitious idea to make Rainier Avenue South, Seattle’s most dangerous street, safe enough for a parent to bike with their four-year-old (you must watch this YouTube!)

A crew, led by visionary Shirley Savel, and leaders Adam Dodge and Travis Merrigan, built 2000 linear feet of bike lanes out of white chalk, white duct tape, green butcher paper and traffic cones on both sides of Rainier between Columbia City and Hillman City.

Ballard Greenways Protected Intersection

Ballard Greenways Protected Intersection

Ballard

The co-leader of Ballard Greenways, Chris Saleeba, also works at one of Seattle’s best bicycle and pedestrian design firms, Alta Planning and Design. Chris, Fred Young, and Steve Durrant of Alta created a protected intersection that was extremely effective at slowing vehicles and allowing people to safely walk and bike across NW 65th and 6th Ave NW, just where the next north-south greenway in Ballard is planned.

The Seattle Department of Transportation concurred NW 65th and 6th NW was a high priority for safety improvements and added a permanent crosswalk in record time.

Chris said the bar owner of Molly McGuires – the most active business in front of the new intersection – came out during the day and talked about how much he loved the improvements and wondered if he could get the crosswalk painted in Irish flag colors as part of Mayor Murray and the Department of Neighborhood’s new community crosswalk program. Read the rest of this entry »

Seattle Neighborhood Greenways throws in the towel

35th Ave SW marchGordon Padelford
April 1, 2015

Seattle Neighborhood Greenways has grown from a scrappy group of six neighbors who met in a church basement in 2011, to an advocacy powerhouse with 20 groups and hundreds of volunteers who influence how millions of dollars are invested in safe street improvements. But, we have decided it is time to throw in the towel.

“It was a difficult decision” says Cathy Tuttle the Executive Director of Seattle Neighborhood Greenways, “But my garden has really been suffering because I’ve been spending so much time on our three citywide priorities; advocating for Complete Streets, Vision Zero, and a progressive transportation levy.”

Donald Brubeck from West Seattle Bike Connections said they had decided to quit advocating for safe crossings of 35th Ave SW and a parallel greenway and instead open a burrito stand. “The burrito traffic light video we made went viral, so we thought we should build on that momentum. Everyone likes burritos.”

Supporters of Safety Over Speeding along Rainier Avenue South

Rainier Valley Greenways leaders realized it was time to give up when they heard making Rainier Ave South safe for everyone would cause up to thirty seconds of delay per mile to prevent hundreds of injuries and deaths: “I mean who has an extra 30 seconds? What’s next – asking us to stop at crosswalks for the elderly?” Read the rest of this entry »

District 6: Ballard & Fremont

Click here to see our 2016 priorities

Local SNG coalition groups involved: Ballard Greenways, Fremont Greenways

What was the 2015 priority? Make 6th Ave NW, including its NW Market Street intersection safe enough for children to get to school.

Campaign Updates: 

  • Big Win! Intersection of Leary, 43rd & 6th Ave NW has new signal and sign improvements, funded by Neighborhood Park & Street Fund application by Fremont Greenways in 2014!
  • Ballard Greenways has been building a coalition of local groups to gather grassroots support for these safe routes to school improvements and have met with SDOT about the issues and opportunities along 6th Ave NW.
  • Big Win! The first Summer Parkway event used 6th Ave NW as its eastern boundary and hundreds of local residents and visitors had the opportunity to ride this route on September 19 2015.
  • Win! Seattle Neighborhood Greenways Executive Director Cathy Tuttle co-led a Jane’s Walk along 6th Ave NW from the Burke Gilman Trail to NW 58th Street.
  • East Ballard Community Association, Groundswell NW, and West Woodland Neighbors completed a 3-hour walking audit of 6th Ave NW on August 22, 2015.
  • Win! PARK(ing) Day entry for 6th Ave NW and NW 65th won the PARK(ing) Day Design Competition. Alta Planning and Design’s Chris Saleeba and Fred Young constructed the winning protected crossing that was in place Sept 18-19, 2015.
  • Win! Pacific Crest Elementary at 6th Ave NW and NW 46th was awarded an SDOT mini-grant to study safe routes for their community.
    6th Ave NW and NW 65th Protected Intersection for PARKing Day and Summer Parkways

    6th Ave NW and NW 65th Protected Intersection for PARKing Day and Summer Parkways

    6th Ave NW Walking Audit with E Ballard Community Association, West Woodland Neighbors, and Groundswell NW

    6th Ave NW Walking Audit with E Ballard Community Association, West Woodland Neighbors, and Groundswell NW

 

New push button signals & signs to connect people who walk & bike from Burke Gilman Trail across Leary to 6th Ave NW

New push button signals & signs to connect people who walk & bike from Burke Gilman Trail across Leary to 6th Ave NW

Ballard Greenways discussing the intersection of NW Market and 6th Ave with Councilmember Mike O'Brien and business owner Mike Hale

Ballard Greenways discussing the intersection of NW Market and 6th Ave with Councilmember Mike O’Brien and business owner Mike Hale

 

District 3: Central, Capitol Hill, Montlake, Madison

Click here to see our 2016 priorities

Local SNG coalition groups involved: Central Seattle Greenways, Madison Park Greenways, Montlake Greenways, University Greenways

Healthy transportation activists and community groups meet to discuss SR 520

Healthy transportation activists and community groups meet to discuss SR 520

SR-520 desire lines

SR-520 desire lines

What was the 2015 priority?
The Washington Department of Transportation must design better walking and biking connections as part of the SR-520 project.

This project will either reconnect the neighborhoods of Montlake, University District, Capitol Hill, and Portage Bay or further divide them. Thanks to the sustained efforts of our dedicated volunteers we can expect to see direct and safe walking and biking connections through the SR-520 interchange. We helped create a strong City of Seattle resolution outlining the needed improvements to the walking and biking connections as the design process moves to the next stage.

Thank you to everyone who made these successes possible!

Campaign Updates

  • Big Win! Through our advocacy, the City Council adopted a strong Resolution requiring a better design.
  • We pulled together our healthy transportation allies and on January 28, 2015 sent this letter outlining the changes we expect to see from the design to make it functional for people walking and biking. We have met with city councilmembers and state representatives to discuss these issues.

2015 Campaigns

From six people in a church basement in 2011 working to bring neighborhood greenways to Seattle, we’ve grown to a coalition of 20 neighborhood groups working on all aspects of safe & healthy streets across Seattle. We’ve had enormous success getting our greenway routes and intersection priorities funded and built, as well as building coalitions and funding for larger safe street infrastructure projects.

For 2015, our coalition decided to focus on three citywide priorities and seven priorities from groups in the new City Council Districts. Ten priorities in all. Here they are:2015 SNG Priorities Map

CITYWIDE PRIORITIES

  • Vision Zero. Advocate for strong local and city support for engineered speed reduction, enforcement, education, and more. See campaign page
  • Renew Bridging the Gap. Improve and get out the votes for a citywide funding package focused on healthy transportation as Bridging the Gap expires in 2015. See campaign page
  • Complete Streets. Make sure our own Seattle Complete Streets Ordinance is enforced. Make sure major SDOT improvement projects are funded and tied to walk/bike safety improvements. See campaign page

COUNCIL DISTRICT PRIORITIES

  • District 1: Create safe intersections across 35th Ave SW and build a parallel greenway. See campaign page
  • District 2: Redesign Rainier Ave S so that it is no longer the most dangerous street in the city. See campaign page
  • District 3: Design and fund better walking and biking connections as part of the SR-520 project. See campaign page
  • District 4: Bring the Wallingford Greenway up to current standards and connect it to the future light rail station on Brooklyn NE. See campaign page
  • District 5: Elevate the N/NW 92nd St. as the major cross-town all ages and abilities connection in North Seattle, and connect people across Aurora and I-5 with direct links to Wilson Pacific School, North Seattle College, and Northgate Light Rail Station. See campaign page
  • District 6: Make 6th Ave NW, including its NW Market Street intersection safe enough for children to get to school. See campaign page
  • District 7: Ensure the Lake to Bay Loop is an all ages and abilities route. See campaign page

Seattle Neighborhood Greenway Coalition 2015 Priorities

February 1, 2015

From six people in a church basement in 2011 working to bring neighborhood greenways to Seattle, we’ve grown to a coalition of 20 neighborhood groups working on all aspects of safe & healthy streets across Seattle. We’ve had enormous success getting our greenway routes and intersection priorities funded and built, as well as building coalitions and funding for larger safe street infrastructure projects.

For 2015, our coalition decided to focus on three citywide priorities and seven priorities from groups in the new City Council Districts. Ten priorities in all. Here they are:2015 SNG Priorities Map

CITYWIDE PRIORITIES

  • Vision Zero. Advocate for strong local and city support for engineered speed reduction, enforcement, education, and more
  • Renew Bridging the Gap. Improve and get out the votes for a citywide funding package focused on healthy transportation as Bridging the Gap expires in 2015.
  • Complete Streets. Make sure our own Seattle Complete Streets Ordinance is enforced. Make sure major SDOT improvement projects are funded and tied to walk/bike safety improvements.

COUNCIL DISTRICT PRIORITIES

  • District 1: Create safe intersections across 35th Ave SW and build a parallel greenway.
  • District 2: Redesign Rainier Ave S so that it is no longer the most dangerous street in the city.
  • District 3: Design and fund better walking and biking connections as part of the SR-520 project.
  • District 4: Bring the Wallingford Greenway up to current standards and connect it to the future light rail station on Brooklyn NE.
  • District 5: Elevate the N/NW 92nd St. as the major cross-town all ages and abilities connection in North Seattle, and connect people across Aurora and I-5 with direct links to Wilson Pacific School, North Seattle College, and Northgate Light Rail Station.
  • District 6: Make 6th Ave NW, including its NW Market Street intersection safe enough for children to get to school.
  • District 7: Ensure the Lake to Bay Loop is an all ages and abilities route.

 

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