Found 90 search results for keyword: move seattle

Construction Zone Mobility: Room For Improvement

May 2015
Cross-posted with The UrbanistConstruction Zone Signs

Seattle is a boom town. Until recently, traffic plans during new building construction disregarded the mobility of people walking and biking beside building sites. This disregard is a safety issue, not just an inconvenience.

Last year, Seattle created a Construction Hub Coordination Program with dedicated staff who work to improve access for all during construction in high growth areas designated by the City as “Construction Hubs.”. Construction sites in South Lake Union, Ballard, Alaska Way, Capitol Hill, and West Seattle Junction are getting better for people walking and biking near them, but problems still remain, in these locations and throughout the city.

In Seattle, we still place a higher value on preserving street parking around construction sites at the expense of providing safe access for people who walk or bike. Sidewalks are routinely blocked, and safe intersection crossings removed for extended periods. Read the rest of this entry »

District 4: Wallingford, University, Bryant, Laurelhurst

Click here to see our 2016 priorities

Local SNG Coalition groups involved: Wallingford Greenways, University Greenways

What is the 2015 priority? Bring the Wallingford Neighborhood Greenway up to current standards and connect it to the future light rail station on Brooklyn NE.
cropped-Girls-Crossing-at-Wallingford-and-43rd.jpg

Campaign Updates

  • Big Win! The 43rd Wallingford Neighborhood Greenway’s crossing of Stone Way was awarded $89,300 to install a Rapid Rectangular Flashing Beacon using the Neighborhood Park and Street Fund process.
  • We are encouraged that SDOT is currently undergoing a review of existing neighborhood greenways and identifying needed improvements.
  • Big Win! $2 million to study and improve the N 45th St Bridge crossing between Wallingford and the University District was included for funding and voter approved in the Move Seattle Levy.

2015 Campaigns

From six people in a church basement in 2011 working to bring neighborhood greenways to Seattle, we’ve grown to a coalition of 20 neighborhood groups working on all aspects of safe & healthy streets across Seattle. We’ve had enormous success getting our greenway routes and intersection priorities funded and built, as well as building coalitions and funding for larger safe street infrastructure projects.

For 2015, our coalition decided to focus on three citywide priorities and seven priorities from groups in the new City Council Districts. Ten priorities in all. Here they are:2015 SNG Priorities Map

CITYWIDE PRIORITIES

  • Vision Zero. Advocate for strong local and city support for engineered speed reduction, enforcement, education, and more. See campaign page
  • Renew Bridging the Gap. Improve and get out the votes for a citywide funding package focused on healthy transportation as Bridging the Gap expires in 2015. See campaign page
  • Complete Streets. Make sure our own Seattle Complete Streets Ordinance is enforced. Make sure major SDOT improvement projects are funded and tied to walk/bike safety improvements. See campaign page

COUNCIL DISTRICT PRIORITIES

  • District 1: Create safe intersections across 35th Ave SW and build a parallel greenway. See campaign page
  • District 2: Redesign Rainier Ave S so that it is no longer the most dangerous street in the city. See campaign page
  • District 3: Design and fund better walking and biking connections as part of the SR-520 project. See campaign page
  • District 4: Bring the Wallingford Greenway up to current standards and connect it to the future light rail station on Brooklyn NE. See campaign page
  • District 5: Elevate the N/NW 92nd St. as the major cross-town all ages and abilities connection in North Seattle, and connect people across Aurora and I-5 with direct links to Wilson Pacific School, North Seattle College, and Northgate Light Rail Station. See campaign page
  • District 6: Make 6th Ave NW, including its NW Market Street intersection safe enough for children to get to school. See campaign page
  • District 7: Ensure the Lake to Bay Loop is an all ages and abilities route. See campaign page

Get Your Tickets Now for the Juiciest Bike Discussion of the Year!

Seattle Neighborhood Greenways, Queen Anne Greenways, and Impact Hub Seattle, are pleased to present: 

Building the Cycling City: Dutch Lessons for Seattle

An evening with Melissa & Chris Bruntlett Bruntletts

 

Please join us for a very special keynote presentation and community panel: 

 
Friday, October 5, 2018, 5:00 – 7:00 pm
Impact Hub Seattle
220 2nd Ave S, Main Event Space (1st floor, ADA accessible, bike storage available)

Tickets are sliding scale, $5 – $100, and on sale now. Proceeds benefit nonprofit Seattle Neighborhood Greenways. Please consider a solidarity ticket of $10 or more to support Seattle Neighborhood Greenways’ critically needed work in support of safe and healthy streets citywide.

Click here to order tickets now!

 

About Building the Cycling City
Around the world, countries marvel at Dutch cycling culture and infrastructure while an unfortunate “that would never work here” attitude prevents real change from happening in most U.S. cities, including our own. But the Dutch overcame many of the same challenges as other car-clogged cities like Seattle, and their story is an important model for moving us toward a more human-scale, bike-friendly future.

BuildingTheCyclingCityBookCover

Join Melissa and Chris Bruntlett for a fun, visual, and interactive discussion. They’ll share the triumphs and challenges of the Dutch cycling story, show how some of the ideas are already being adopted in global cities, and draw out concrete lessons for Seattle to follow their lead.

Following the Bruntletts’ inspiring, photo-rich presentation of what other cities are doing, a lively, solution-focused panel will bring the ideas home to Seattle and ask, “What will it really take to get there?”

The event is scheduled for Friday, October 5th, 5:00-7:00pm at the main event space in Impact Hub Seattle. We’ll have beer, wine, substantive appetizers, and time for socializing! 

CyclingCitySaveTheDateOct5th

 

About Melissa & Chris Bruntlett

Melissa and Chris Bruntlett are the co-founders of Modacity; a creative agency using words, photography, and film to inspire happier, healthier, simpler forms of mobility. Together, they work with a variety of organizations—including municipal governments, transportation agencies, non-profits, and corporate clients—to address the evolving needs of cities large and small, and enable a variety of mobility options as a way to create successful and more livable regions. They have garnered an international audience by sharing the stories of residents benefiting from these changes, and celebrating how designing streets for people makes them work better for everyone. Melissa and Chris’ stories of emerging bike cultures from around the world have been featured in Momentum Magazine, Grist, Spacing Magazine, and the Huffington Post, as well as many local publications in their hometown of Vancouver. Best known as @modacitylife on social media, they continually challenge the auto-centric thinking that dominates the mainstream discourse, and present a compelling vision of a future where their two children (and countless others) can grow up enjoying the freedom of unlimited movement in a human-scale city.

 

About Seattle Neighborhood Greenways

Seattle Neighborhood Greenways empowers communities to advocate for safe, healthy streets for all people. We are creating a transportation system that gives us more choice for how to get around, keeps us safer, saves us money, and reduces climate pollution. We can get there by making every neighborhood  a great place to walk, bike and live.

Click here to order tickets now!

Basic Bike Network

What is “the Basic Bike Network”?

We know that safety is a major barrier — sixty percent of the population in Seattle wants to bike more, and dangerous streets is the number one reason they choose not to. But the Basic Bike Network, which would build safe and comfortable bike connections to get people where they need to go in and around the center city, has been delayed again and again — see this story for background information.

BBN-Complete

PikePineBikeLanesLabelsWe also know that when you build connected bike routes, people will come in droves. Around the world, cities like Vancouver, Calgary, New York and London have all implemented connected bike networks, and have seen ridership explode. Even here in Seattle, bike ridership jumped 30% on 2nd Ave when the protected bike lanes there were connected to an incomplete route on Pike and Pine. Every connection matters and makes the network more useful.

In fact, the City of Seattle expects that ridership will double with the completion of the Basic Bike network. That’s why we’re asking the City of Seattle to #BuildItNow!

UPDATE (July 30, 2018): City Council Passes Basic Bike Network Plan

Seattle City Council unanimously voted today in favor of building major pieces of the basic bike network. Thanks to this vote you and your loved ones will have safe, protected routes to bike into and through downtown Seattle from the north, south, and east (2nd Ave to Westlake, Dearborn, and Broadway) by the end of next year.

Other pieces of the network will move forward through the design and outreach phases. The map below outlines what will be built by the end of 2019, what will be designed, and what remains to be done. Safe places to bike on Roy St and 1st Ave N streets are not included in this plan, but we are working to get them built through the Key Arena redevelopment process.

BasicBikeNetworkMap-Resolution-Emphasis

Current Map of the Planned Basic Bike Network

It takes people-power to move a bold vision like the #BasicBikeNetwork forward. High fives and deep appreciation to all who’ve advocated, rallied, donated, and shared their stories so far! While this is an exciting milestone worth celebrating, but aren’t done yet. We’re not going to stop fighting for the Basic Bike Network until all the pieces are built.

Some of the Basic Bike Network supporters at City Council on July 30

Some of the Basic Bike Network supporters at City Council on July 30

 

How Can I Make a Difference?

Here are five ways to keep the momentum going:

  1. Take a moment to email a thank you to the Mayor for committing to build safe, convenient protected bike lanes on Pike/Pine connecting downtown and Capitol Hill by 2019.
  2. Volunteer with us.
  3. Become a monthly donor. Your gift allows us to fight for safe places to bike for people of all ages and abilities.
  4. Share a photo of yourself along with a quote about why a basic bike network is important to you. Check out our inspiring album on Facebook and share your own story with tags #basicbikenetwork, #wecantwait, and #seattlegreenways. Or email Clara@SeattleGreenways.org for other ways to volunteer to make a difference.
  5. Ride your bike & bring a friend! There is safety in numbers – research has shown the more people who ride their bikes, the safer everyone is. Summer is a great time to encourage a friend, colleague, or family member to try biking in Seattle.

You are making a difference and together we will build a city that reflects our common needs and shared values by making every neighborhood a great place to walk, bike, and live.

people high fiving through bike lane copy


What was the “people protected bike lane”?

Everyone who wants to bike should be able to because biking can make us happier, keep us healthier, save us money, and reduce climate pollution. That’s why we’re advocating to build a connected network of safe and comfortable streets for people biking.

At 8:00am on the morning of Bike Everywhere Day, we took this message to the street by forming Seattle’s first people-protected bike lane in front of City Hall on 4th Avenue. The hugely successful free speech action and the rally that followed demonstrated the joy and safety that protected bike lanes can bring to our streets.

Standing side by side, we created a colorful human barrier between people riding bicycles and car traffic. Five group rides from around the city (Beacon Hill, Columbia City, Fremont, Ravenna, and West Seattle) joined people on their regular commuting route and converged at the people-protected bike lane amidst a positive fanfare of cheering, high fives, and waving streamers.

ride and rally wavingAcross the street afterwards, the Rally for the Basic Bike Network featured a slate of powerful female speakers including Councilmember Sally Bagshaw, who spoke to the crowd about the need to build the basic bike network:
sally bagshaw speaking (image from her office)
Clara Cantor, Community Organizer for Seattle Neighborhood Greenways, rallied the crowd chanting “Build it Now!”

Clara at 2018 ride and rally

The mood turned more somber when Clara asked the crowd to “raise your hand if you have been involved in a crash or close call in the last month” and every hand in the audience went up, including Councilmember Rob Johnson’s.

ride and rally 2018 people who have been invovled in crash or near miss in past monthAnd as a people-powered movement we can’t win these improvements without you.

ppbl shot (ben hughey) thank youA big high five to everyone who showed up and took part in the people protected bike lane or the ride and rally, and to all the volunteers who helped us make signs, carry supplies in their cargo bikes, spread the word, or otherwise supported us to make this event a success.

Safer Crossings for Madison Park Business District

Story by Bob Edmiston, Madison Park Greenways.

In the summer of 2013, a Madison Park resident was struck by a driver while walking across East Madison Street in a marked crosswalk, in broad daylight—and was critically injured. The community organized and formally asked the City of Seattle to make it safer to cross the street in our little neighborhood business district.

The community’s focus was on a complicated 6-way intersection where East Madison Street, McGilvra Blvd East and East Garfield Street meet. Many of the crossing distances there ranged from 50-100 feet across, exposing people on foot to hazardous speeding traffic. Parking near and within the intersection was blocking critical lines of sight between people walking and people driving. The combination of these compounding design flaws are thought to have factored into the tragic collision of 2013. Fixing these hazards became the objective of our Madison Park Greenways group.

MadisonParkSafeCrossingIntersectionImprovementProjectIllustrationMedium

 

Five years later, after many grant applications, pitches, community design meetings and countless volunteer hours, the project is now nearly complete. The results are excellent. The adjoining streets have been squared up, entrances narrowed, curb lines moved in order to reduce pedestrian crossing distances and sight lines have been improved. Landscaping is being restored in a way that will permanently keep sight lines clear.

MadisonParkSafeCrossingMadisonAndMcGilvraMadisonParkSafeCrossingMcGilvraElementary7MadisonParkSafeCrossingMcGilvraElementary2MadisonParkSafeCrossingStarbucks1

 

By eliminating the worst safety issues of this very complicated intersection, this project has made Madison Park’s central intersection feel safer to cross on foot and safer to drive through. Since this intersection is the primary crossing for children who attend McGilvra Elementary School, the improved intersection opens up the possibility of walking or biking to school to more of the community.

MadisonImprovement6Medium

 

The man who was critically injured has recovered has been anticipating completion of this project. It was his desire that the crossing between Wells Fargo Bank and Starbucks be finally made safe for those who live, visit and work here.

MadisonParkSafeCrossingWellsFargo2MadisonImprovement1Medium

 

This project would not have been possible without a sustained multi-year direct collaboration effort between the Madison Park Community Council, the Madison Park Business Association, Madison Park Greenways and the City of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods and Seattle Department of Transportation staff. They have all done outstanding work. We plan on holding a ribbon cutting celebration soon.

Inspired by this community-driven success story? Pitch in to help make more outcomes like this possible.

Arena Redevelopment to Bring Walking and Biking Improvements to N. Downtown

Story by Andrew Koved, Queen Anne Greenways.

The KeyArena redevelopment project has the opportunity to transform the Uptown neighborhood—for better or for worse. Seattle Neighborhood Greenways has been working hard to ensure that the Oakview Group, the developers hired for the project, will be building infrastructure and setting norms that will set the course for a world-class urban street system that can move people safely and efficiently to and from the arena, and connect to existing city-wide routes that will serve as key access corridors into and through Uptown, Belltown, South Lake Union, and beyond.

Uptown Mobility map walk and bike

 

Evaluating the impact on surrounding neighborhoods

The redevelopment of KeyArena has generated multiple studies, groups, and actions—with many questions focused on the impacts this project will have on surrounding neighborhoods.

When Oakview Development Group agreed with the City of Seattle to redevelop the arena for use for hockey and basketball, they funded a study to look at the mobility and transportation needs of the area. This resulting North Downtown Mobility Action Plan (NDMAP), looked at the redevelopment of the arena at Seattle Center, the rest of the Uptown neighborhood, as well as Belltown and South Lake Union neighborhoods.

Although not named explicitly in the process, Denny Triangle and parts of Lower Queen Anne were taken into consideration for the study as well due to their proximity. The goal of the study was to understand the current issues with pedestrian, bike, transit, freight, and public realm infrastructure in these areas, and then fund the implementation of priority projects from among the findings. Oakview Group will pay roughly $40 million over 20 years for these improvements; funding separate from mitigation costs which will be required through the environmental impact statement.

North Downtown is seeing truly rapid growth, and it is critical that people on foot and on bicycles have safe and connected routes into and through the city. Seattle Department of Transportation has taken a piecemeal approach that has led to a small number of wins—such as the increased ridership on the 2nd Avenue bike lane—but many more continued gaps. Oakview Group was interested in studying these areas and helping to identify those projects that hold massive potential.

Oakview Group brings neighborhood groups together, and faces some challenges

Oakview Group sought a local, on-the-ground, perspective to best understand the transportation issues plaguing these neighborhoods, and so they brought together a large and varied collection of neighborhood groups and citywide organizations. Since December, Oakview Group has held monthly meetings to bring together this broad coalition to work on the NDMAP and receive their feedback.

Queen Anne Greenways and Seattle Neighborhood Greenways were a part of these meetings, along with organizations such as Cascade Bicycle Club, Uptown Alliance, Seattle Center, Rise Up Belltown and Community Councils from Queen Anne and South Lake Union. The meetings combined the personal community knowledge with the expertise from Oakview Group, staff from City of Seattle including Seattle Department of Transportation and Council Member Sally Bagshaws’ office, and Nelson Nygaard, the firm conducting the NDMAP. The coalition faced challenges surrounding the diversity of interests represented at the table, with many groups not seeing the same concerns nor seeking the same solutions.

Seattle Neighborhood Greenways leads discussion on public benefits

With a long list of issues facing pedestrians and cyclists in the North Downton, Belltown, and South Lake Union areas of the city, Seattle Neighborhood Greenways staff, along with Andrew Koved of Queen Anne Greenways, brought together a smaller number of community leaders to prioritize projects that maximize the Oakview Group investment and help complete a basic bicycle and pedestrian network through North Downtown. In collaboration with Cascade Bicycle Club, Seattle Neighborhood Greenways hosted an open house to get direct community feedback on the most important projects and goals for the NDMAP investment.

Turn-out to the event was high despite the drizzly March evening, with nearly 100 community members from the various impacted neighborhoods. With snacks and drinks in hand, neighbors pored over maps and marked their priorities for pedestrian and bicycle projects that would facilitate mobility and increase safety. A wonderful range of experiences and organizations were heard, and the outcome of the evening reflected this diversity. It was important to make sure that the pedestrian and bicycle group led by Seattle Neighborhood Greenways understood the pain points of Seattle’s infrastructure, and this evening was key to ensuring that the projects selected by Oakview Group reflected the needs of the community.

GetToTheGameHappyHourGroupShotMediumGetToTheGameHappyHourRyanKelseyMedium

SNG priority for improved mobility: connected corridors to and through North Downtown

Though the needs and recommendations from the open house were many, they focused around people’s ability to safely connect into and through the North Downtown area along key connected corridors. The SNG-led group distilled these ideas into a set list of priority projects and improvements, focused on key pieces of the network that would have the greatest number of impacted users.

Response to Oakview Group’s Draft EIS Statement

Oakview Group released their draft environmental impact statement (DEIS) in May, and Seattle Neighborhood Greenways and Queen Anne Greenways participated in two opportunities to provide feedback and recommendations. The larger coalition of neighborhood groups participated in a second negotiating process and produced a strong letter endorsing a multimodal vision for the neighborhood and pushing the Oakview Group to work hard to decrease Arena attendees’ reliance on private vehicles.

Final Recommendations from SNG, Cascade Bicycle Club, and Feet First

Then, SNG also produced a more direct letter in collaboration with Cascade and Feet First that was more detailed in asking for specific routes and improvements for people walking and riding bikes.

The final list of recommendations includes: 

  • Street improvements surrounding Seattle Center including protected bike lanes on Roy St, 5th Avenue, Broad Street, Queen Anne Avenue, and 1st Avenue North, and pedestrian improvements on Valley Street and Olympic Place.
  • Wayfinding and other improvements on Harrison Street connecting Seattle Center to the John Coney Overpass for people walking and biking.
  • Connections east from Seattle Center that prioritize pedestrian and bicycle movement including signal re-timing and upgrading along Mercer and Denny, and the construction of a Thomas Street Neighborhood Greenway.
  • Connections to downtown routes including Bell Street and 4th Avenue.
  • Other recommendations including expanding bicycle parking, incorporating lighting and wayfinding, and partnering with bikeshare and rideshare companies to provide designated parking and pickup locations.

Exactly what projects will get funded is not yet known. Projects have a chance of being funded either by the limited NDMAP funding or the larger pot of mitigation funding from the Community Benefits Agreement that will result from the final environmental impact statement when it is released this summer. Then, all of these agreements must be approved by the Seattle City Council.

Although the final outcomes cannot yet be known, it does look as though many of the suggestions from Seattle Neighborhood Greenways and from the larger neighborhood coalition will move forward.

To show your public support for this project, mark your calendar for the next Seattle City Council Select Committee for Arenas meeting on July 26 at 2:00 pm.

 

Inspired by this community-driven leadership? Pitch in to help make more organizing like this possible.

New Bike Parking Regs for the Win!

Images and story courtesy of Bicycle Security Advisors.

There can only be as many people biking as there are safe, convenient, and accessible places to lock-up their bikes at destinations. Every year, more people are biking in Seattle, and that means we need to support them with new, better standards that will help ensure this growth continues over the next decade.

Fortunately, on April 2, the Seattle City Council passed major improvements to the city’s bike parking requirements in new buildings. The improved standards will help ensure people will always have a safe, convenient, and accessible location to park their bicycle, whether it’s in a building or on the sidewalk for a short errand or trip.

BikeStorageMulticolorBrocksDriveResized

In addition to improving the bicycle parking requirements, the legislation, CB 119221, also updated many off-street parking requirements, aiming to reduce the city’s dependence on single-occupancy vehicles and to support transit-oriented development.  

In support of CB 119221, Seattle Neighborhood Greenways worked in a broad coalition alongside Bicycle Security Advisors, Cascade Bicycle Club, Capitol Hill Housing, Futurewise, Transportation Choices Coalition, Transit Riders Union, Sierra Club, and 350 Seattle to meet with councilmembers, send supportive email messages, and provide public comment at the city council hearings. This work built on bike parking advocacy in previous years such as the Rackathon event we co-hosted.

bike parking reform 2018The new legislation brings Seattle’s bicycle parking requirements closer in line with the other major Pacific Northwest cities of Portland and Vancouver, B.C., as well as other peer cities across the nation.

A centerpiece criteria for determining how much bike parking would be required was the City of Seattle’s performance target to quadruple bicycle ridership by 2030, the equivalent of one-in-eight trips being by bike. Here are a few of the key highlights:

  • Increases the amount of required bicycle parking. In comparison to eight peer cities, Seattle now has the highest requirements for long-term parking for 13 “land use categories,” and the highest requirements for short-term parking for 8 land use categories.
  • Requires office buildings with more than 100,000 square-feet to provide commuter showers for different genders, and exempts the shower facilities from a new building’s size limits.
  • Improves the incentive policy for bicycle parking by allowing developers to trade 1 car stall for two bicycle parking spaces, and increased the cap on this provision to now allow up to 20 percent of the required car parking to be removed.
  • Requires bike parking to be accessible without the use of stairs.
  • Requires bike rooms to accommodate family, cargo, and electric bikes.
  • Requires more temporary bike parking, aka “bike valet” parking, for major events such as Sounders games.

bike valetMore work still needs to be done.  Many of the code’s new provisions, such as definitions of “safe” and “convenient,” and the new bike valet allowance, will need to be implemented through new guidelines to be adopted by the Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT).

The parking reform legislation was stewarded by Councilmember Rob Johnson, chair of the Council’s Planning, Land Use and Zoning (PLUZ) Committee, and his staff. In addition, Councilmember Mike O’Brien, vice-chair of the PLUZ Committee, also worked tirelessly with bicycle, transit, housing, and environmental stakeholders in helping to shape the final legislation.

—-

*This post is a modification of a blog post by Bicycle Security Advisors. Follow Bicycle Security Advisors on Twitter.

Save the Basic Bike Network

 

31961859_1692955744121011_3116401357712523264_nJump to three ways you can help save the Basic Bike Network during Bike Month.

May is National Bike Month. A month when everyone is encouraged to dust off their bike, pump up their tires and try biking to get to work, school, local businesses, or just for fun. Everyone who wants to bike should be able to because biking can make us happier, keep us healthier, save us money, and reduce pollution.

But right now, too many people find biking to where they want to go scary or uncomfortable. In fact, a lack of safe streets is the #1 reason people in Seattle don’t bike more.

It doesn’t have to be this way.

Way more people bike in cities that have safe, comfortable, and convenient bike networks. Around the world, cities like Vancouver, Calgary, New York, and London have all implemented connected bike networks and seen ridership explode. Here in Seattle, when the 2nd Ave protected bike lanes were connected to Pike and Pine, ridership on 2nd Ave jumped 30%. But Seattle still has a long way to go.

That’s why we created a vision of a bike network that connects all neighborhoods, starting with our fastest growing “Urban Villages.”

 

And collaborating with Cascade Bicycle Club, we also created a plan for a “Basic Bike Network” for downtown Seattle.

Downtown Minimum grid map with arrows 6 copy

Unfortunately, in 2016, former Mayor Ed Murray put the Basic Bike Network on hold until after a new transportation plan for downtown Seattle called One Center City could be developed.

We pushed back against these delays. Led by family bikers, we filled City Hall holding signs saying “My Family Bikes” and “Safe Streets Now,” and chanting “We can’t wait!” As a result of these protests, the city promised to build parts of bike lanes on 2nd Ave and Pike/Pine and include bike routes in the One Center City planning process.

2016 we can't wait rally photo by SBB

 

The two-year One Center City (OCC) collaborative planning process resulted in a plan for downtown that safely moved more people. The planning process was organized by a working group made up of government, agency, and dozens of community stakeholders. Last fall, after years of study, analysis, and compromise, the committee approved a holistic plan that would keep everyone moving downtown. The plan included new bike and bus lanes that would increase safety (decreasing collisions by 7-18%), move more people with more efficiency (10,000 more people per hour), and reduce travel times for everyone (30 seconds to 1 minute compared to the no-action alternative). Additionally, the city’s analysis showed that the Basic Bike Network was a key part of the solution, because by building it the number of people biking downtown would double by 2023.

But when the new Durkan administration came to power, they pushed aside the One Center City community stakeholder committee, ditched the compromise, delayed the bike lanes, and watered down the transit improvements. Once again, we rallied caring community members who were fed up with all the delays. We sent hundreds of emails to elected leaders and testified at City Council meetings.

 

DZ41qV2VMAETFhZ.jpg large

While we haven’t won yet, our elected leaders are listening now. Help us keep the momentum going.

Here are three quick things you can can do during Bike Month to make the Basic Bike Network a reality:

  1. Show up at the Rally for the Basic Bike Network on Bike Everywhere Day, May 18. Gather at 8:00, program 8:15 – 8:45 AM at the Seattle City Hall Plaza.
  2. Share a photo of yourself along with a quote about why a basic bike network is important to you. Check out our inspiring album on Facebook and share your own story with tags #basicbikenetwork, #wecantwait, and #seattlegreenways.
  3. Ride your bike & bring a friend! There is safety in numbers – research has shown the more people who ride their bikes, the safer everyone is. May is a great time to encourage a friend, colleague, or family member to try biking in Seattle.

Bonus action: Become a monthly donor. Seattle Neighborhood Greenways is a 501(c)3 and we depend on your financial support to make every neighborhood a great place to walk, bike, and live.

Thank you!

Downtown biking

Advocacy Alert: Safer bike lanes downtown are in jeopardy

Urgent: Safer bike lanes downtown are in jeopardy.

Click here to send a message to government leaders who are on the fence about whether to go forward with protected bike lanes on 4th Ave downtown.

When protected bike lanes were added to 2nd Ave following the tragic death of Sher Kung, not only did 2nd Ave become much safer but the number of people biking jumped dramatically and just increased by 30% again this year.

 

Downtown biking

 

We have the same opportunity to create protected bike lanes on 4th ave to make it safe and comfortable for people of all ages and abilities to access downtown jobs, and destinations like the flagship library, the downtown YMCA, City Hall, and the Cinerama just to name a few. If built along with other parts of the #BasicBikeNetwork, the city expects to more than double the number of people who bike downtown by 2023. And we also know that protected bike lanes make it safer to walk too by separating car turning and walking signal phases.

The city and region spent years of planning and millions of dollars to come up with a comprehensive plan that will improve transit travel times by 40%, move more people overall, and make it safer to walk and bike downtown.

Send a message to government leaders: we want action now, not more delays. #WeCantWait
If you value our work, please donate to keep us going.

 

 

Next page »

« Previous page