Tag Archive: pedestrian

Speak up for Vision Zero and the Solidarity Budget!

Yesterday, someone died while travelling on our streets. Same with last week. This is unacceptable. Everyone has a right to get to where they need to go safely.

Seattle has committed to Vision Zero, the goal to eliminate road-traffic deaths and serious injuries by 2030. But we are failing to reach that goal. One big reason why is that the Vision Zero program has been chronically underfunded. Decades of neglect have created a huge backlog of high-speed streets that see crash after crash, and often lack basic safe places to walk, roll, or bike.

Right now, with your help we can triple the Vision Zero budget, and invest in safety projects like sidewalks, safety redesigns, crosswalks, and traffic calming where they are needed most.

Two easy ways to ask the City Council to invest in Vision Zero and the Solidarity Budget in the 2022 Seattle City Budget:

  • Phone in to give public comment: Thursday morning, Oct 28, when Seattle City Council discusses the transportation budget! Public comment starts at 9:30 am, sign-up opens at 7:30 am. You’ll get a second opportunity during the public hearing on Nov 10 at 5:30 pm. How-to guide here.
  • Click here to send an email of support to the entire City Council

So far in 2021, 26 people have been killed by traffic violence on our streets, including two people killed in two separate incidents just in the last week — and we still have two months of the darkest, wettest time of year. And traffic violence, like so much else in our city, is disproportionately killing and harming people of color, disabled people, elders, low-income people, and unhoused people. Each number is a person, and each death has rippling effects on their family, friends, and community. We must do better.

We also recognize that safety on our streets doesn’t just mean safety from speeding vehicles, and that people are being killed on our streets by systemic racist policing, by gun violence, and because they are currently experiencing homelessness. That’s why we’ve endorsed the Solidarity Budget, asking Council to defund the Seattle Police Department and reinvest in communities, including in Vision Zero. The Solidarity Budget is a collective call towards a city budget that centers the needs of the most marginalized and vulnerable Seattle residents and aligns our budget with our shared values and priorities.

A young girl holds a sign that says

Earlier this year, the City Council doubled the Vision Zero budget for 2021. Now, they are voting to make that change permanent. Councilmember Lewis has also proposed an additional increase that would triple the Vision Zero budget going forward. This funding would make a huge difference in the number and quality of safety improvements our city is able to install each year, and the number of lives we’d be able to save.

We’re also supporting amendments proposed by Councilmember Morales increasing safe places to walk in both new sidewalk construction and Home Zones.

Other important proposed amendments to make the budget better reflect our city’s values and priorities:

  1. Lake Washington Boulevard: Conduct equitable engagement to design and implement permanent improvements for Lake Washington Boulevard.
  2. Martin Luther King Jr Blvd Safety: Ask SDOT to come up with a plan to make this high crash corridor safer for people walking, biking, and accessing transit.
  3. Remove Data Collection from the Police: Ask SDOT to analyze what it would take to collect street safety and crash data in order to move this work away from the Seattle Police Department.
  4. Smart Planning: Demand accountability for the “Citywide Integrated Transportation Plan,” which may undercut our efforts to make safer streets.

Act now to ask the City Council to invest in Vision Zero and the Solidarity Budget in the 2022 Seattle City Budget:

  • Phone in to give public comment Thursday morning, Oct 28, when Seattle City Council discusses the transportation budget! Public comment starts at 9:30 am, sign-up opens at 7:30 am. You’ll get a second opportunity during the public hearing on Nov 10 at 5:30 pm. How-to guide here.
  • Click here to send an email of support to the entire City Council

 

Get involved in Seattle Neighborhood Greenways by volunteering with us or donating to support our work.

Thank you for your continued advocacy!

 

Clara Cantor
she/her

Community Organizer
Seattle Neighborhood Greenways
Website – Twitter – Facebook

#Fix65th Rally for Safer Streets

NE 65th is vital for businesses, schools, and people who live, work, and play in NE Seattle.

Sign a petition to support this campaign.

But in just the past three years in this short stretch NE 65th, 12 people walking or biking have been killed or sent to the hospital along just 0.3 miles of NE 65th St. In that same period of time, 12 car-only collisions injured 19 people.

It doesn’t have to be this way.

Join us next Thursday June 16 8-9am at a kick-off rally asking the Mayor to #Fix65th. :

We can’t wait for more injuries or fatalities.

NE 65th safety issues
Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1333479236666617/

Should you be lit up like an airport runway to cross the street?

by Glen Buhlman, Kirkland Greenways
October 17, 2014

Should you need to be lit up like an airport runway in order to cross a street without getting hit by a car?

Be_Safe_Be_Seen_Day_Release_5.jpg.662x0_q100_crop-scalePublic Domain Road Safety Authority Ireland

This expectation is becoming common in our region. Rather than focus on the lack of safety on our streets and committing the required funding and staff resources to engineer safer streets, we too often look for cheap ways to make ourselves feel like we have solved the problem, all the while continuing to spend the bulk of our transportation budget (your tax money) “improving” our roads for cars to go faster. It is a vicious cycle that makes many people feel it is too unsafe to walk or ride bicycles or get to transit and instead drive, further exacerbating the traffic problems.

The Northshore Utility District is handing out the exact same safety vests as those pictured with Santa to local school children. The City of Kirkland puts flags at crosswalks for people to wave at cars when they cross the street to try to shame the people driving the cars into stopping.

To be clear, Kirkland Greenways is not opposed to stopgap and immediate solutions to try to save lives while we do the hard work to make our streets safe for people who walk and bike. But the Kirkland flag program has existed for almost 20 years!

How long does Northshore Utility District expect everyone who walks anywhere to wear a reflective vest? How long before we have flags and vests, maybe also with motion activated flashing LEDs and sirens on them, hanging at all crosswalks in our region? How about we engineer our streets to make them safe for people rather than engineering people to make them safe on our streets?

At Community Future Day in Kirkland on Apr 26, 2014, residents were given play money in the amount of the city’s budget and asked how they would spend it.  Residents chose to spend 25% / 26% / 27% on pedestrian/bicycling/transit respectively and only 21% on automobile projects.

We all own these streets. It is up to all of us to decide how we want to invest in and use our streets. There has been a big change, at least in Kirkland, Washington and Kenmore, Washington, and the change has been pretty clearly in favor of making our streets safe for people to walk and bicycle.

Let’s invest in more than vests and orange flags, shall we?