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Rainier Safety Project Is a Home Run!

May 9 2016
Cathy Tuttle

Update: Action Opportunity

Please join us for a Celebrate Safe Streets rally thanking the city for the progress so far and supporting further action.

Celebrate Safe Streets August 17th flyer


Great news about Rainier Ave!

Rainier Rechannelization stats

Seattle’s most dangerous street, Rainier Ave S, got a 4-mile makeover last year, thanks to the tireless advocacy work of Rainier Valley Greenways volunteers AND excellent work by the Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) Vision Zero Road Safety Corridor team.

A year later, reports are coming in showing Rainier Ave S is another successful road safety project!

  • Coming from a total of 1243 total collisions, including 630 injuries and two fatalities in the past three years, Rainier is posting some great safety stats!
  • Top end speeding — that is, people traveling faster than 40 mph — has decreased 95%
  • Travel time for the Route 7 bus that carries 11,000+ people per day has remained unchanged northbound and actually improved schedule time along the route by 1.5 minutes southbound.
  • And best of all, total collisions are down 14%, injuries are reduced 31%, and walk/bike injuries are down a whopping 40%.

Get Well Card for Businesses Hit By Cars held by SNG staff Phyllis Porter & Gordon Padelford on Rainier Ave S

All this is to say, the pilot safety project on Rainier Ave S is working, and working well. More safety improvements are planned — and they can’t come soon enough.

Thank you SDOT, and thank you Rainier Valley Greenways!

Get involved and learn more!

 

District 2: Rainier Ave S

Thanks for your help in 2016! Read about what you helped accomplished.

YES! I want to learn more about how to help Rainier Ave S!

Children hurry across Rainier at S Myrtle St where a safe crossing is our budget priority!

Making children run across a deadly four lane road is not okay.

What is the problem?
Rainier Ave S is Seattle’s most dangerous street.

What is the solution (the 2016 priority)?
Make Rainier Ave S safe for people to walk and bike along and across. Expand the safety corridor project, create safe crossings and build protected bike lanes from Hillman City to Columbia City.

Who is involved?
Seattle Neighborhood Greenways is working to empower Rainier Valley Greenways and their extensive community connections.

Campaign Updates

    • Get involved: Sign our petition thanking the city for making part of Rainier Ave safer and calling for further action:

  • Get Involved: We could use your help! Let us know that you support this priority!
  • N-S Rainier Greenway: SDOT will begin building a neighborhood greenway that runs north-south through the entire Rainier Valley in 2016! We have been working to make this route as good as it can be given that SDOT has been unwilling to put protected bike lanes on Rainier Ave itself so far.
  • Accessible Mt Baker: We are actively supporting the Accessible Mt Baker proposal that would dramatically improve safety and accessibility for the northern end of the Rainier Valley. Rainier Valley Greenways is partnering with the Mt Baker Hub and Beacon Safe Streets Community group to make this become a reality.
  • Rainier Ave Safety Project: We are supporting the expansion of the successful (the data shows its working as planned) Rainier Road Safety Corridor Project.
  • Raised Crosswalks for Rainier Beach: We have submitted a proposal for improving the intersection of Henderson and Rainier Ave S which is at the heart of the Rainier Beach community. Key community destinations people must use this intersection to walk to include four schools, the library, the community center, the main neighborhood park, and the light rail station.
  • This priority builds off the momentum from our 2015 Rainier Ave campaign.
Get Well Card for Businesses Hit By Cars held by SNG staff Phyllis Porter & Gordon Padelford on Rainier Ave S

Get Well Card for Rainier Businesses Hit By Cars

Winning Campaign To Fix Seattle's Most Dangerous Street

Winning Campaign To Fix Seattle’s Most Dangerous Street

Rainier Ave S Protected Bike Lanes experiment

Hillman City to Columbia City family friendly bike lane experiment

 

Return to 2016 campaigns overview

Rainier Beach HS Students Demand Safe Routes to School

Rainier Beach High School Transit Riders Union 10-22-15 event

Rainier Beach High School Transit Riders Union 10-22-15 event

We support Rainier Beach High School students and the Transit Riders Union in their request to help ALL students to a safe route to school.

To date, our city has failed to provide safe healthy streets for students who need to walk or bike to school. Seattle Neighborhood Greenways supporters would prefer students have a healthy option of walking and biking to school. We see free Orca passes and yellow safety crossing flags as a stopgap measure until Seattle uses Move Seattle Levy monies to complete and connected grid of healthy safe streets for all ages and abilities throughout Seattle.

Community support event for Orca passes is next Thursday, October 22, 6:00 – 8:00 PM at Rainier Beach High School in the Performing Arts Center. Guests include Councilmembers Tom Rasmussen and Bruce Harrell. Transit Riders Union petition in support.

From the event Facebook Page

Join students, teachers, staff, parents, and community members for an evening of interactive storytelling and collective action! Help us call upon our elected representatives on the City Council, Mayor Murray, and the Seattle School Board to fund bus passes for ALL public school students who need Metro to get to school.

Currently, only students who live more than two miles (as the crow flies) from their school are eligible for a free ORCA pass subsidized by the school district. Not only is four or more miles a long way to walk to and from school, often there is no safe route to walk, due to dangerous traffic or neighborhoods.

Since 2011, Metro fares for youth have risen from $0.75 to $1.25 and now to $1.50, or $54 for a monthly pass. This is not affordable for low-income families. It’s time for our city to provide free transportation for all students to get to school!

This summer, as part of a six week program of the Children’s Defense Fund Freedom Schools, 130 Rainier Valley scholars ages 5-18 organized a march between Seattle Public Schools Headquarters and City Hall, where they rallied and raised awareness about the issue of inequitable transportation in their community. Calling the walk zone policy “inequitable,” students mobilized alongside community members saying that for many students, especially those experiencing poverty, this policy “creates a barrier to getting to school, and therefore a barrier to their education.”

This Town Hall event will be held at Rainier Beach High School in the Performing Arts Center on Thursday, October 22, 6:00 – 8:00 PM. Guests include Councilmembers Tom Rasmussen and Bruce Harrell. Hope to see you there!

Please sign TRU’s petition as well: http://transitriders.org/free-orca-passes-for-public-school-students/

Rainier Embraces Transportation Transformation

Mayor Murray at Rainier Ave S Open House 7-301-15

Mayor Murray at Rainier Ave S Open House 7-301-15

Cathy Tuttle July 31, 2015

In a sweltering and packed gymnasium, with the Mayor, City Councilmember Bruce Harrell, and Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) Director Scott Kubly shouting through a rolled up paper megaphone (the sound system had failed), three of the most transformative projects SDOT has proposed to date were launched.

Harrell tossed down his megaphone and shouted, “We are DONE with Rainier Ave S being a freeway! People live here! We need this street to work for all of us!”

Here are the three transformative Rainier Valley projects (including SNGreenway’s top 2015 priority for Council District 2):

Click on image to see project details of Accessible Mt. Baker

Click on image to see project details of Accessible Mt. Baker

  1. Rainier North-South Greenway stretching from I-90 to Rainier Beach. Will be completed in 2016. Route identified with extensive input from Rainier Valley Greenways and Seattle Bike Advisory Board.
  2. Accessible Mt. Baker signals an SDOT commitment to prioritize people around transit. It’s too long been the norm for Sound Transit to plop in light rail stations and blithely leave it up to local municipalities to make their stations accessible to people who need to walk or bike to them. Accessible Mt. Baker takes up the challenge with a real station area planning.
  3. Rainier Avenue South Safety Corridor Pilot begins construction on Monday August 3 and wraps up construction on August 14. Not only is did SDOT’s Vision Zero Strategic Advisor Jim Curtin present an unprecedentedly short project timeline, the Rainier Ave S project has the potential to transform what is Seattle’s most deadly street.

Read the rest of this entry »

Safety Over Speeding: Rainier Day of Action May 20

STEP UP & SPEAK OUT FOR SAFETY!

  • What: Join the Day of Action! An event to raise awareness and build support for a safer Rainier Ave S. Join a crosswalk action, help collect petition signatures, post flyers, take portraits of supporters, or sign a Get Well Soon Rainier Ave card. However you want to be involved, we could use your help!
  • When: Wednesday May 20th from 5:30-7:30 PM (5:30-6:30 main event)
  • Where: Columbia City at S Edmunds St & Rainier Ave S.
  • Why: With 1,243 crashes in the past three years, Rainier Avenue South is the most dangerous street in Seattle. Every crash impacts our community – from cars careening into our businesses to our children being run down by drivers who never even stop. We say enough! Rainier Ave S should be made safe for all people to walk, bike, drive, catch the bus, shop, and live.

Can make it to the event? Sign the Rainier Valley Greenways petition to support SAFETY OVER SPEEDING!

day of action half sheet

Rainier Ave Safety Over Speeding Petition

We support safety over speeding on Rainier Avenue South10590468_658041130978208_3795220991592249110_n

With 1,243 crashes in the past three years, Rainier Avenue South is the most dangerous street in Seattle. Every crash impacts our community – from cars careening into our businesses to our children being run down by drivers who never even stop. We say enough! Rainier Ave S should be made safe for all people to walk, bike, drive, catch the bus, shop, and live.

We need our neighborhood back. We need,

  1. Safe Speeds of 25 MPH along Rainier Avenue South and 20 MPH engineered in our community centers of Columbia City, Hillman City, and Rainier Beach with enforcement.

  2. Safe & Dignified Crossings of Rainier Ave S where people driving stop for people walking, and people walking have enough to time cross before the traffic light changes.

  3. A Safe Place for People to Bike on Rainier Ave S.

Sign your name in support below:

 

Visit the Rainier Valley Greenways page or District 2 Campaign page. Visit our partners (external) Bike WorksCascade Bicycle Club, or Feet First.

District 2: Rainier Valley & Beacon Hill

Click here to see our 2016 priorities

In 2015, community advocates from Rainier Valley Greenways and Beacon B.I.K.E.S. set an audacious goal for 2015: Fix Seattle’s most dangerous street. And they won! They rallied their community members and organizations like Cascade to support a campaign called Safety Over Speeding.

Safety Over Speeding recognizes that with 1,243 crashes in the past three years, Rainier Avenue South is the most dangerous street in Seattle. Every crash impacts our community – from cars careening into our businesses to our children being run down by drivers who never even stop. We say enough! Rainier Ave S should be made safe for all people to walk, bike, drive, catch the bus, shop, and live.

We need our neighborhood back. We need,

  1. Safe Speeds of 25 MPH along Rainier Avenue South and 20 MPH engineered in our community centers of Columbia City, Hillman City, and Rainier Beach with enforcement.

  2. Safe & Dignified Crossings of Rainier Ave S where people driving stop for people walking, and people walking have enough to time cross before the traffic light changes.

  3. A Safe Place for People to Bike on Rainier Ave S.

Campaign Updates

Rainer Ave Campaign

Click the map to see a presentation of the changes

Click the map to see a presentation of the changes

Big update! Our grassroots campaign has used twenty-one different tactics such as posting a giant hand-painted “Get Well Soon Rainier Ave” card on a local business that had been plowed into by a car, framing the conversation in the media around the human toll of the road rather than the fear of change, and hosting a Day of Action crosswalk protest. Your hard work has paid off! A segment of Rainier Ave S received a safety redesign in August 2015, with more miles to come in 2016.

But there is still more work to do, and we still need your help making Seattle’s most dangerous street safer by expanding and improving the redesign.

 

Is Rainier Ave S Off-Scale Dangerous? Yes.

Cathy Tuttle
March 4, 2015

Open larger view in Tableau.

Open larger view in Tableau.

During a recent Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) evening meeting to talk about Rainier Ave S safety improvements, a driver crashed into a nearby local business on Rainier Ave South.

Ironic, yes? Unusual? Unfortunately no. This was car number EIGHT driven into a Rainier Ave S business in the past year, and in 2014 alone, Rainier Ave S was hit with 1,243 crashes.

SDOT’s slide deck for their safety meeting included a table illustrating the number of crashes on Rainier Ave S, relative to other high capacity corridors around Seattle. It showed Rainier Ave S does indeed have a crashing problem.

What the SDOT table didn’t illustrate was that Rainier Ave S doesn’t carry nearly as many vehicles per day as other local high capacity corridors. When you factor in the fact Rainier Ave S carries far fewer vehicles, the carnage on Rainier Ave S spikes dramatically.

Kenneth Trease @kptrease put together a Tableau viz chart to illustrate the utter chaos on Rainier Ave South. Per vehicle mile, Rainier Ave S has THREE times as many crashes as Lake City Way NE, and FOUR times as many as Aurora Avenue North.

Yes, we need #VisionZeroRainier now! Sign the petition!

Safety Over Speeding On Rainier Avenue South

Supporters of Safety Over Speeding along Rainier Avenue South

Supporters of Safety Over Speeding along Rainier Avenue South

Sign petition I SUPPORT SAFETY OVER SPEEDING on Rainier Ave S: http://bit.ly/1FIZrhv

With 1,243 crashes in the past three years, Rainier Avenue South is the most dangerous street in Seattle. Every crash impacts our community – from cars careening into our businesses to our children being run down by drivers who never even stop. This has been going on for years and we all know so many people who have been hurt or worse. We aren’t just statistics. At this point, many of us are scared to bike down Rainier Ave South-many people even fear walking across the street.

We say enough! Rainier Ave S should be made safe for all people to walk, bike, drive, catch the bus, shop, and live.

We’ve had many corridor safety projects on Rainier Avenue South over the years. Yet our street is still a menace to the people who live and work along it. We value safety over speeding and we hope your new Rainier Avenue South Road Safety Corridor Project will address our key priority areas.

Our key priorities have been discussed at our monthly Rainier Valley Greenways meetings, and in our on-going outreach to community organizations and neighbors. We have focused on five key priority areas:

  1. Slower speeds. 25 MPH along Rainier Avenue South and 20 MPH in our ‘Urban Villages’ (Columbia City, Hillman City, and Rainier Beach business districts).
  1. Pedestrian oriented signal timing. We are very ready to have our signals be compliant with federal standards. We reported signal timing problems more than a year ago. We don’t want to force our seniors and children to run across the street. In as many places as possible, we’d like to see pedestrian lead time at major crossings. Finally, we’d like to make sure signals are timed to 20 MPH in our Villages and 25 MPH along all of Rainier with signage that indicates these speeds.
  1. Emphasize safe crossing of Rainier. Raised crosswalks in key areas and curb bulbs to enhance pedestrian and bicyclists safety are some of the tools we want to see if we are finally going to reclaim our major neighborhood business street.
  1. Protected Bike Lane on Rainier Ave S.  Rechannelize our street to make Rainier Ave South a more Complete Street for all modes, so that people walking, biking, riding the bus or driving a car or truck are comfortable, and let each have their own place on the street.
  1. Enforcement. Please make sure people abide by the speed limits. We want to add school zone cameras for high schools, red light cameras, and police enforcement.

We are focused on our three main business districts with ideas to see if we can slow speed in our business and cultural centers.  Raised crosswalks along Rainier — at S Edmunds St. in Columbia City, at S Orcas St. in Hillman City, and at S Henderson St. in Rainier Beach — are what we believe could be the beginning of improvements along Rainier Ave South to make it safer for everyone and to try to control speeding and refocus distracted drivers.

We love our neighborhoods in the Rainier Valley.  We love to live, work and play in this community. But the current state of Rainier Ave South seriously impacts the quality of our lives.  It is an unpleasant experience and far too often an unsafe situation for people driving, using transit, walking and biking.

 

Rainier Valley Greenways: Safety Over Speeding

February 2, 2015

Rainier Valley has been the site of multiple horrific incidents of traffic violence. In just the past six months, a multi-car pileup on Rainier Ave S sent 10 people to Harbor-view Hospital, and seven people were injured when a driver crashed into a hair salon in Columbia City. A hit and run left 7-year-old Zeytuna Edo, walking in a crosswalk with her sister, with multiple life-threatening injuries. In the past three year, there have been 1,243 crashes on Rainier Avenue South, the highest crash corridor in the City of Seattle.

The people of Rainier Valley Greenways have had enough. Working closely with Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT), Rainier Valley Greenways supports 25 m.p.h. speed limits along the length of Rainier Ave S that could prevent traffic violence in the future. Following the guidelines of Vision Zero, Rainier Valley Greenways has also chosen intersections in the heart of three commercial corridors (Columbia City, Hillman City, Rainier Beach) where they will advocate for intersection improvements intended to slow speeds to 20 m.p.h.

Safety Over Speeding is the new direction for Rainier Valley Greenways.

A speed table may be one way to engineer safer 20 m.p.h. streets in the heart of the Hillman City business district.

A speed table may be one way to engineer safer 20 m.p.h. streets in the heart of the Hillman City business district.

Facebook: Rainier Valley Greenways
Twitter: @RVGreenways
Google Group (request membership)Rainier Valley Greenways
Contact: Deb Salls 206-695-2522 deb@bikeworks.org

Rainier Valley Greenways Prioritized ACTION PLAN 2014

 

 

 

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