Category Archive: News

Speak up for Sidewalks and Schoolkids!

Friends,

Did you see the news this week that nearly $3 million that would have funded sidewalks and crosswalks for schools has been siphoned into the city’s “general fund”?

This funding would have helped children at 25 schools across Seattle walk to class safely by investing in projects like enhanced crosswalks, traffic calming, and walkways. Instead these projects will be delayed, adding to the 300-year backlog of sidewalk projects.

We need you to speak up now in support for funding sidewalks and crosswalks so that kids in Seattle can get safely to and from school.

Act Now! buttonkids-crossing.jpgSeattle Neighborhood Greenways has championed the Safe Routes to School program since our founding in 2011 as a core piece of our work. We’re committed to making every neighborhood a great place to walk and making sure every child can safely walk to school. But in order to do that we need our city leaders to increase funding for safe routes to schools and sidewalks.

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We need you to act now and send a letter to your councilmembers asking them to ensure that Safe Routes to School are adequately funded and kids can get safely to and from school.

Act Now! button

Thank you for your continued advocacy!

Be well,
Clara

 

 

clara

Clara Cantor

she/her/hers
(206) 681-5526
Community Organizer
Seattle Neighborhood Greenways

 

P.S. Whether or not we win back this funding, Seattle Neighborhood Greenways will continue to advocate to adequately fund safe routes to school and sidewalks next year, and hope you will stay engaged in this effort.

Sign up here to volunteer with us or Donate here. Thank you.

Why SNG is Endorsing 1631 the Clear Air Initiative

As you may have heard, Seattle Neighborhood Greenways has endorsed 1631 the Clean Air, Clean Energy initiativeVolunteer to help pass this exciting measure. 

Transportation by vehicles is the leading source of Seattle’s contribution to climate change, accounting for two-thirds of our greenhouse-gas emissions. The terrible smoke that we all choked on this past summer and the recent International Panel on Climate Change report remind us of the urgent need to act now to reduce our emissions.

Clean air and a stable climate for our families and future generations is one reason many of us, myself included, are dedicated to this work of transforming our streets and transportation system. And this initiative will not only put Washington on a path towards a stable climate, it will invest in clean transportation projects here in Seattle.

You may have heard some of the $32 million worth of negative ads from the big oil companies (the most money spent on any Washington initiative in history), but don’t buy them. Instead check out this list of Frequently Asked Questions.

We don’t have $32 million to spend on ads, but we do have passionate people like you and me who care about our future, so please consider volunteering in the final days of this important race.

Lastly, don’t forget to vote — it’s going to be very close!

Thanks for all that you do,

Gordon in pollution mask
Gordon Padelford

Executive Director
Seattle Neighborhood Greenways

Speak up for Walking and Biking in Seattle’s 2018 City Budget!

We care about making every neighborhood in Seattle a great place to walk, bike, and live, but too many important projects are being delayed or watered down.

That’s why Seattle Neighborhood Greenways is leading the charge as part of a new transportation alliance Move All Seattle Sustainably (MASS)We’re calling on the Mayor and City Council to go beyond general statements of support for transportation and environmental issues, and act now to align our city budget with Seattle’s values.

Walking

Seattle Neighborhood Greenways, backed by the MASS alliance, has four main city budget priorities this year:

  1. Safer Intersections. Halt spending on adaptive signals, which prioritize cars over everyone else, until the technology can prioritize people walking and biking.
  2. Traffic Calming. Fund a Home Zone pilot project, using diverters and traffic calming to limit and slow traffic on residential streets, particularly in areas with no sidewalks.
  3. Basic Bike Network. Add additional funding to get people to and from the new Arena and into and through Uptown and South Lake Union.
  4. Equitable Street Parks. Restore funding to successful Pavement to Parks projects with an equity focus.

Act Now! button

Act now to ask City Council to support these priorities, and join us on Wednesday, October 24 at 2:00 pm at the Transportation Committee Budget Hearing. Public comment is at the end of the meeting, likely around 4:00 pm.

Get involved in Seattle Neighborhood Greenways by volunteering with us or donating to support our work.
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Thank you for your continued advocacy!

 clara

Clara Cantor

(206) 681-5526
Community Organizer
Seattle Neighborhood Greenways

Website – Twitter – Facebook

Would You Walk or Bike to the New Seattle Center Arena?

We need YOU to speak up for walking and biking at the Special City Council Meeting for Civic Arenas at Seattle City Hall this Friday, September 14, at 9:30 am.
The City Council will vote on ordinances relating to the redevelopment of the Seattle Center Arena (formerly known as Key Arena) this Friday, September 14, at 9:30 am. Public comment will be at the beginning of the meeting.
Show Up and Ask the City to:
  1. Complete the Basic Bike Network by requiring OakView Group (OVG) to fund a small square of safe bike connections immediately surrounding Seattle Center and the new Arena: on Roy St, 5th Ave, and Broad St in addition to the already-planned 1st Ave N / Queen Anne Ave Couplet. This will provide safe, connected routes for people on bikes from SLU and points north, not just from downtown.
  2. Extend pedestrian routes off of Seattle Center Campus to the East (to SLU), South (to Downtown), and West (to the waterfront).
  3. Put a hold on implementing adaptive signal technology until it can measure and mitigate pedestrian delay.

We will be there with signs to share. RSVP to Clara@Seattlegreenways.org or by replying to this email.

A group of people smiling and waving signs in support of the Safe Streets and the Basic Bike Network
The expansion of the Seattle Center Arena (formerly Key Arena) is slated to begin construction this October. The Arena developer has a responsibility to the City to ensure that event attendees have viable, comfortable, and efficient transportation options, and to incentivise their use. But the current plans map out a future for Uptown clogged by cars.

The current plans include a goal to have a whopping 55% of opening day arena event attendees arrive by private vehicle, with only 1% of event attendees arriving by bike and 10% by walking. We need City Council to require this big development to aim for more efficient transportation.

NHL Seattle found that 40% of expected attendees live within 4 miles of the arena. That’s 5,000 more people per event that could be choosing to walk or bike to the Arena if it were a comfortable, intuitive experience. Additionally, no matter how people start their journey to the arena, every event attendee will be a pedestrian for some part of their trip – walking to transit hubs or parking garages.

People walking on a city street.

Developer investments in walking and biking infrastructure will improve the transportation experience for those arriving via any mode, minimize the negative impacts on the neighborhood, increase interactions between event attendees and local businesses, and will have the largest positive impact for the dollars spent.

The Oakview Group (OVG), the Arena developers, have been asked to fund many positive improvements, including:

  • Protected bike lanes (PBLs) and bus-only lanes on 1st Ave N and Queen Anne Ave, directly in front of the arena. Additionally, some pedestrian improvements to Seattle Center Campus and streets immediately adjacent.

  • Centralized locations for a small amount of personal bike parking, to stage and park bikeshare bikes, and bike facilities for employees.

  • Designated drop off zone for TNCs, creating predictability and reducing conflicts and safety issues between TNCs and people walking and biking (negotiations still underway).

However, this mitigation represents the bare minimum, and City Council should push OVG to be more aggressive in their modeshare goals and to fund the transportation mitigation that will enable success in reaching them.

Map of the Basic Bike Network

We Need YOU to Show Up and Ask the City to:

  1. Complete the Basic Bike Network (above) by requiring OVG to fund a small square of remaining connections immediately surrounding Seattle Center and the new Arena: on Roy St (1st Ave N to 5th Ave), 5th Ave (Roy St to Broad St), and Broad St (2nd Ave to 5th Ave) in addition to the already-planned 1st Ave N / Queen Anne Ave Couplet. This will provide safe, connected routes for people on bikes from SLU and points north, not just from downtown.
  2. Extend pedestrian routes off of Seattle Center Campus to the East (to SLU via Thomas St Greenway), South (to Downtown via 4th Ave), and West (to the waterfront and the Elliot Bay Trail via the John Coney overpass). This includes wayfinding, lighting, ADA compliant curb ramps, and sidewalk repair.
  3. Put a hold on implementing adaptive signal technology until SDOT commits to measuring and valuing delay for people walking (as they do currently for people driving), and the technology advances to a point where it is able to measure and minimize that delay.Friday, September 14, at 9:30 am.

We’ll see you there!

 

A headshot of Clara Cantor

Clara Cantor

Community Organizer
Seattle Neighborhood Greenways
Website – Twitter – Facebook

Too many kids are being injured along Rainier Ave

We have had enough of kids being injured along Rainier Ave. Last week, two young girls were hit at the intersection of Rainier Ave and S Henderson St, and another was hit back in May of this year.

There is a crash every single day on Rainier Avenue South on average. The city must act now to fix Seattle’s most dangerous street.

Here is how you can help:

1) Sign the petition asking the city to improve the intersection of Rainier Ave S and S Henderson St before school starts, and to finish the Rainier Ave safety redesign project.

2) Join us for a discussion this Saturday with the mayor

Who: Mayor Jenny Durkan and people who care about fixing Rainier Ave
What: A respectful discussion of community concerns and potential solutions.
When: 1:00 to 1:45 this Saturday, August 18th
Where: Intersection of Rainier Ave S & S Henderson St
RSVP
: https://www.facebook.com/events/305026020255076

Thank you for caring and taking action,

Gordon Padelford
Executive Director
Seattle Neighborhood Greenways

P.S. We have not yet been able to make contact with the family/families of the two girls who were hit last week. If you know them and could put us in touch so we can support them we would be very grateful.

Three wins for people walking and biking

Some of the Basic Bike Network supporters at City Council on July 30

What a Monday! On Monday, July 30 at Seattle City Council passed three exciting pieces of legislation:

  1. The Seattle City Council unanimously voted today in favor of building major pieces of the basic bike network. Thanks to this vote you and your loved ones will have safe, protected routes to bike into and through downtown Seattle from the north, south, and east (2nd Ave to Westlake, Dearborn, and Broadway) by the end of next year. Read more.
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  2. The Council also voted unanimously to require SDOT to improve walking and biking conditions in the Delridge neighborhood as part of the Delridge Way Multimodal Corridor Project. Read more.Potential Delridge bike network compromise
  3. The Council also voted unanimously to pass an expansion of the privately funded bike share program with a focus on equity and reducing the number of bikes blocking sidewalks. Read more.

29623886668_bf81942d60_oAppreciate these wins? Support our work so we can keep this momentum going.

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#BasicBikeNetwork FINAL VOTE July 30!

Thanks to continued community support of the Basic Bike Network, we are on the final steps of a major win: the full Seattle City Council will vote on July 30 whether to construct three critical bicycling connections by the end of 2019!

Show up on Monday, July 30, 2:00 pm, at Seattle City Hall to stand with the group and demonstrate the need for the #BasicBikeNetwork.

RSVP and learn more.

Can’t make it? Send an email voicing your support.

A woman and her two children sit in the City Council chambers smiling and holding handmade signs in support of safe streets.
What’s the Basic Bike Network? It’s a vision for a connected network of safe streets to bike on–not just disconnected pieces here and there.
But the basic bike network has been delayed year after year, including a disappointing delay announced this March. We raised our voices, rallied in front of City Hall, and even took to the streets for Seattle’s first people-protected bike lane to make our message clear: We can’t wait any longer to make our city safer and more accessible.

And we are starting to be heard. You may have seen our message that, thanks to your advocacy, the city committed to protected bike lanes on the Pike/Pine Corridor without further delays. And last week, in front of an impassioned crowd of community members advocating for safe streets, this legislation passed unanimously out of the City Council’s Transportation and Sustainability Committee. Help us keep the momentum going.
If this legislation passes, you and your loved ones will have safe, protected routes to bike into and through downtown Seattle from the north, south, and east (2nd Ave to Westlake, Dearborn, and Broadway) by the end of next year. Let’s make this happen.
A comparison between current, unsafe conditions at the intersection of Pine and Boren and a happy image of a protected bike lane filled with happy bikers on a rainy day.
When: Monday, July 30, 2:00 – 3:00 pm
Where: Seattle City Hall, in the Council Chambers (2nd floor).
How: By standing with us and holding signs of support (we will have some available) during the public comment period of the meeting. It is likely to be a crowded meeting, so we will stand up to speak as a group. If you’re interested in speaking please contact clara@seattlegreenways.org. Kids and families very welcome!
Thank you and we’ll see you on July 30!

A headshot of Clara CantorClara Cantor

Community Organizer
Seattle Neighborhood Greenways
WebsiteTwitterFacebook

P.S. Thank you for your continued advocacy – you are making a difference!

Basic Bike Network Vote July 18!

Thanks to incredible community advocacy in support of the Basic Bike Network, we are on the cusp of a major win: the Seattle City Council Transportation Committee is considering legislation requiring the construction of three critical connections by the end of 2019, but we need your support!

Show up at noon on Wednesday, July 18, at Seattle City Hall, and ask the Council to vote for the #BasicBikeNetwork. We will have snacks and signs, or feel free to bring your own.

RSVP and learn more.

Can’t make it? Send an email voicing your support.

ApuTestifingAtCityHall

What’s the Basic Bike Network? It’s a vision for a connected network of safe streets to bike on–not just disconnected pieces here and there.

BasicBikeNetworkMap2018

But the basic bike network has been delayed year after year, including a disappointing delay announced this March. We raised our voices, rallied in front of City Hall, and even took to the streets for Seattle’s first people-protected bike lane to make our message clear: We can’t wait any longer to make our city safer and more accessible.

And we are starting to be heard. You may have seen our message that, thanks to your advocacy, the city committed to protected bike lanes on the Pike/Pine Corridor without further delays. Help us keep the momentum going.
If this legislation passes, you and your loved ones will have safe, protected routes to bike into and through downtown Seattle from the north, south, and east (2nd Ave to Westlake, Dearborn, and Broadway) by the end of next year. Let’s make this happen.
A comparison between current, unsafe conditions at the intersection of Pine and Boren and a happy image of a protected bike lane filled with happy bikers on a rainy day.

Join us as we tell the City Council: Vote for the Basic Bike Network now! When: Wednesday, July 18, 11:50 am – 12:20 pmWhere: Seattle City Hall, in the Council Chambers (2nd floor).RSVP: On Facebook or to clara@seattlegreenways.org

How: By standing with us and holding signs of support (we will have some available) during the public comment period of the meeting. If you’re interested in speaking please contact clara@seattlegreenways.org. Feel free to bring a bag lunch and a friend. Kids and families very welcome!

Can’t make it? Send an email voicing your support.

Thank you and we’ll see you on July 18!

A headshot of Clara CantorClara Cantor

Community Organizer

Seattle Neighborhood Greenways

WebsiteTwitterFacebook

 

P.S. Thank you for your continued advocacy – you are making a difference!

Pike/Pine in 2019: Big win thanks to your advocacy!

Thanks to your advocacy, the Mayor and SDOT staff have committed to building safe, protected bike lanes on Pike/Pine connecting downtown and Capitol Hill by 2019!

Please take a moment to thank the Mayor now.

A group of people holding signs in support of the Basic Bike Network gathered around a speaker at a microphone.

This is a significant win in a prolonged campaign for the Basic Bike Network. We have gathered to raise our voices time and again—via email petitions, in City Council chambers, and at powerful rallies—and we are being heard. 

That’s why we are so excited that the Mayor and SDOT have committed to building the crucial east-west connection of the Basic Bike Network in 2019, with additional upgrades to follow in the coming years. 

A comparison between current, unsafe conditions at the intersection of Pine and Boren and a happy image of a protected bike lane filled with happy bikers on a rainy day.

Please take a moment to thank the Mayor for committing to building protected bike lanes on Pike/Pine from Downtown to Capitol Hill in 2019! Let’s keep the momentum for the Basic Bike Network going!

Thank you for your continued advocacy – you are making a difference!

Safer Crossings for Madison Park Business District

Story by Bob Edmiston, Madison Park Greenways.

In the summer of 2013, a Madison Park resident was struck by a driver while walking across East Madison Street in a marked crosswalk, in broad daylight—and was critically injured. The community organized and formally asked the City of Seattle to make it safer to cross the street in our little neighborhood business district.

The community’s focus was on a complicated 6-way intersection where East Madison Street, McGilvra Blvd East and East Garfield Street meet. Many of the crossing distances there ranged from 50-100 feet across, exposing people on foot to hazardous speeding traffic. Parking near and within the intersection was blocking critical lines of sight between people walking and people driving. The combination of these compounding design flaws are thought to have factored into the tragic collision of 2013. Fixing these hazards became the objective of our Madison Park Greenways group.

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Five years later, after many grant applications, pitches, community design meetings and countless volunteer hours, the project is now nearly complete. The results are excellent. The adjoining streets have been squared up, entrances narrowed, curb lines moved in order to reduce pedestrian crossing distances and sight lines have been improved. Landscaping is being restored in a way that will permanently keep sight lines clear.

MadisonParkSafeCrossingMadisonAndMcGilvraMadisonParkSafeCrossingMcGilvraElementary7MadisonParkSafeCrossingMcGilvraElementary2MadisonParkSafeCrossingStarbucks1

 

By eliminating the worst safety issues of this very complicated intersection, this project has made Madison Park’s central intersection feel safer to cross on foot and safer to drive through. Since this intersection is the primary crossing for children who attend McGilvra Elementary School, the improved intersection opens up the possibility of walking or biking to school to more of the community.

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The man who was critically injured has recovered has been anticipating completion of this project. It was his desire that the crossing between Wells Fargo Bank and Starbucks be finally made safe for those who live, visit and work here.

MadisonParkSafeCrossingWellsFargo2MadisonImprovement1Medium

 

This project would not have been possible without a sustained multi-year direct collaboration effort between the Madison Park Community Council, the Madison Park Business Association, Madison Park Greenways and the City of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods and Seattle Department of Transportation staff. They have all done outstanding work. We plan on holding a ribbon cutting celebration soon.

Inspired by this community-driven success story? Pitch in to help make more outcomes like this possible.

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